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Radio PR with Georgia McKinney – Podcast Transcript

Newsworthy Founder: Radio PR, Shark Tank + Ranch Water with Georgia McKinney

 

SPEAKERS

Georgia McKinney, Lexie Smith

 

Lexie Smith

Hey guys Lexie here, travel enthusiast, lover of puns, pizza and wine connoisseur and the founder of THEPRBAR inc. and you’re tuning in to the pitching and sipping podcast, from behind the scenes interviews with the media, to honest conversations with other PR pros to a look at inspiring brands and entrepreneurs that are rocking the world of PR, in this podcast, we talked tips while taking sips, and talking about all the things that make those and the world of PR tick. Let’s get started.

 

Georgia McKinney is the Inventor and Founder of Flight Fillow – the reinvented travel pillow. She works a full time corporate job during the day and works to change the way people travel on nights and weekends. Entrepreneurship was never the goal for Georgia, she was simply solving her own frustrations when she came up with the idea for Flight Fillow. Since launching Flight Fillow in 2018, she has navigated the patenting process, figured out how to start a business with free information from the internet, and has been doing DIY PR with the help of Lexie and THEPRBAR landing press opportunities with WGN, Business Insider, MSN, and many other outlets!

 

So Georgia is actually someone that once upon a time before I went full time with THEPRBAR, I literally stopped the heck out of on Instagram, slid into her DMS and begged her to work with me because I thought she and her product were so smart and truly suited for great PR. And no, I’m not joking. That’s actually what happened. So, Georgia, we’re going to talk about your company soon. But first, tell us about life outside of work. What makes you so cool? At least in my eyes? No, you are cool. What do you like to?

 

Georgia McKinney

Um, well, I like to travel which is kind of like where the whole idea and everything started. I have a scratch off map of the world. So the goal is to scratch off all the countries. And I am a big Netflix fan currently binge watching Grey’s Anatomy. And I like to try new drinks. So usually on the weekends, we like go to the liquor store, and I’m just like picking up some weird stuff and just trying them out. So like this past weekend, I tried pickle beer, which is like pickle juice mixed with like, I think an IPA had never heard of it before, but I came across it and I was like, I like pickles. And I like beer. So let’s try it together. And that’s kind of what I do on the weekends.

 

Lexie Smith

Okay, you i was i was interviewed yesterday and someone asked me what my passions are and I literally said I like to travel I like beverages and then if I’m not doing that and then I am Netflix binging so you quite literally just summarize my life. Where’s your favorite place that you’ve ever been? Or top three because I know it can be hard.

 

Georgia McKinney

Top three I would say Japan is definitely one of them. I just because everything is so different. That you definitely know that you’re not in the US anymore and you just everywhere you go is a new experience. So that’s number one. I really loved Germany. Their food is amazing. I went there for Oktoberfest last year and was supposed to be there again like this past week for Oktoberfest again so if that says anything that I was willing to do like back to back I’m in love Germany. And Greece was really fun too.

 

Lexie Smith

So have not done Japan done Germany and is one of my favorite countries but Octoberfest is still on my bucket list. And then Greece was my honeymoon so

 

Georgia McKinney

Oh, nice wearing Greece. Did you guys go?

 

Lexie Smith

We did Mykonos than an island called Paros. And then of course we did Santorini and then we did one night in Athens, which actually cool Athens was cooler. I thought it would be some big ugly dirty city. It actually was. It exceeded my expectations.

 

Georgia McKinney

Yes. But Santorini is definitely so romantic. So

 

Lexie Smith

We went all out because it was our honeymoon. So we had that honeyfund funding to help us with it. Yeah, it

 

Georgia McKinney

Do you guys do that dinner in the sky that they had there?

 

Lexie Smith

Um, we stayed at a I don’t know what that one is where we stayed had to pretty exclusive only to diners allowed like rooftop sunset. So I don’t I don’t know if I know what you’re talking about. No,

 

Georgia McKinney

It’s like they you said at a dinner table. And that’s like a pretty big dinner table. So I didn’t do this. I didn’t have the guts to do at this time. But next time I totally well. So you like so it’s you and probably maybe 12 people total. And then they like take a crane and they lift like the chairs and the table up in the sky. I think you’re like 100 feet up or something. So you are literally like eating your dinner. Like very high up in the air. And you’re just kind of like hanging there. But yeah,

How did I not know of this? So mad!

 

Georgia McKinney

I don’t know. I saw it in Greece and I had thought about trying it and I didn’t know that the guts to do that. But I’ve been thinking about it since it’s been like four years and I’m like, Okay, next time I’m gonna do it.

 

Lexie Smith

Next time. Okay, I might have to add that to my bucket list. I’ve literally never heard of that. And okay, so real quick, let’s because I could actually talk about travel for hours. How does this passion of travel tell us the story of what flight fillow is and how that came to be?

 

Georgia McKinney

Yeah, so flight fillo is the reinvented travel pillow. It fits in your pocket. It’s machine washable, and you can use any sweater you want. Essentially you can take any sweater jacket or hoodie you roll it up. You put it inside the flight fillow and it turns it into a neck pillow. So I came up with this idea because I love to travel. And I was going on a trip to New York, which is only like a two hour flight from Chicago. And it was just for the weekend. So I opted to leave my neck pillow at home. Because I love the comfort of the neck pillow, I just didn’t want the inconvenience of having to carry it around the airport, or using up space in my luggage. And so I left it at home. But when I was on the flight, flying Basic Economy, so like pretty uncomfortable, I had regret. So in desperation, I took my sweater, and I rolled it up. And I found that if I rolled it a certain way, it felt the same as my regular neck pillow. But then if I moved at all, if I like moved in my seat to get comfortable, or if I got up to let someone out of their seat, I had to start all over again. So I kept thinking to myself, if only I had something to hold my sweater just like this, it would be perfect. And so that’s kind of where the idea came from. And so I came home from that trip.

And I was just so excited about the idea that I went it to JoAnne Fabrics to try to like get the material to sew it at home. And I didn’t even know where to start. So I ordered the fabric in feet and quickly found out that was not right, because the sales associate was like struggling to convert feet into yard.

 

Lexie Smith

Oh, right, right. Yeah.

 

Georgia McKinney

So I was like, oh, okay, I did this wrong. Um, but I was just like, so excited about it. And so then I got the fabric, I worked with my dad to, like sew a prototype because I had no idea how to work a sewing machine. And then I got the prototype. And I started using it just for myself. Like I was very happy with just the prototype. It didn’t have a name, I just kept calling it my invention. And I never thought I would be an entrepreneur. I took an entrepreneurship class in college. I told everyone, it wasn’t for me. I’m a total corporate girl. But I found that when I was using my own prototype, people were asking me about it. My friends, my family, strangers on airplanes, a lot of people wanted it. So that’s when I realized that my own personal like frustration with traveling, of wanting the comfort of a neck pillow, but hating to carry it around wasn’t just a Georgia thing. A lot of people had that frustration. So that’s when I decided to bring flight fillow to market and to patent the product.

 

Lexie Smith

No, it’s not just a Georgiathing. I mean, here I am stocking Instagram thinking you’re so cool and begging you to work with me. So it’s far more than just a Georgia thing. It’s a it’s a real issue. So you you mentioned real quick you never thought you would be an entrepreneur. You’re more of a corporate girl. Tell us what was we’ll come back to flight fillow. But what did you do before flight fillow? What’s your background in?

 

Georgia McKinney

Yeah, so um, before flight fillo I had just recently graduated from college, and I was working a full time corporate job. And I still am so that hasn’t changed. I still work a demanding corporate job. Um, probably like more from like, I want to say like nine to five. But that’s not realistic at all. I swear It’s like seven to seven. So I work a demanding full time job. And I work on flight fillow on nights and weekends.

 

Lexie Smith

insane. Well, so what is the corporate job? What kind of are you in marketing? Are you insane? Oh, no,

 

Georgia McKinney

I am a contract negotiator. So I’m a contract negotiator for a large defense company. And so that’s what I do. I negotiate multi billion dollar contracts.

 

Lexie Smith

So badass. And I remember that’s why I kept probing because I wanted everyone to hear that. So one of the many reasons I wanted to invite you, and interview as a guest on the show is I feel like you truly are such a great example of a what a founder can do themselves and what PR can and cannot do for a business because I know you’ve had success. But you’ve also been privy to some things that happen behind the doors of even the top PR agencies in the world, which is rejection. So if you’re up for it, I’d actually love to start talking about the not so fun, fun side of PR. So maybe talk us through some of the less than successful moments. You’ve had wild DIYing PR.

 

Georgia McKinney

Yeah. So I, I’ve definitely been learning as I go. And so a lot of the times when I’m learning it’s because something didn’t work out. And I’m like, Okay, I won’t do that again. So one of the first things that I started doing and realizing was pay to play. So when I was first like pitching different outlets, I would get like yeah, we could feature you for like X amount of dollars. And at first that was all I was running into So I thought that was the only way to get your name out there, I didn’t realize that if you’re going with like a legitimate resource that you’re probably don’t have to pay. So I started paying to play. And I didn’t really see results at all, like, not nothing in sales. And so that sucked because I spent money. And I got my hopes up, and you know, it released and I just waited and waited, and kept refreshing my computer screen, and nothing happened. So that is probably a big lesson. Another one is when I’m pitching people, a lot of times I don’t hear back. And something that you actually helped me with Lexie was, you said that it was like, okay to follow up with people because I was thinking if I followed up with someone, or actually I was thinking, if I emailed them, and they didn’t get back to me, they probably just weren’t interested. But you gave me like permission, basically, to follow up. So I think you and I actually worked together on like, you gave me a sample of what I could use as follow up language. So I started following up with people that I had sent pitches to, and actually had a pretty high conversion rate from those follow ups. I would say probably almost 50% of the people that didn’t respond to me initially responded to my follow ups. So that was a lesson. So is I don’t think I’ve been rejected too many times. As much as just ghosted.

 

Lexie Smith

Crickets ghosted? Yes, that that is the most common common thing I have I if I could, I just want everyone listening to this podcast to note right here and now, I don’t care who you are. I don’t care what PR firm if you’re spending $100,000 on this PR firm, that PR firm is also hearing crickets when you’re going after these organic placements, which you talked about pay for plays, there’s a difference. And we’ll talk about that when it’s organic. And crickets is just kind of the name of the game. So let’s let’s kind of transition over so you learned pay for plays aren’t that great. Boy, do I have opinions on that, I will save that for now. I agree with you is the short answer. That being said, let’s talk about the winning side. Have you ever had any successful more organic placements that you have seen move the needle?

 

Georgia McKinney

Yes. And that is just probably the one of the biggest motivating factors of my business actually is when PR has been successful. So probably starting out, I would say my first like success, organic success was was with a Business Insider. So I actually didn’t pitch Business Insider. So I wasn’t expecting anything to come out. And there was a couple days and I just had this spike in sales. And usually if I have a spike in sales, like I know why, like I’m running a promotion, something’s happening. But there was this. There are these couple of days where I just had this random spike. And I wasn’t really sure what was going on. So I googled flight fillow just to see like what’s going on here. And that’s when I saw that Business Insider had written an article about travel accessories. And flight fillow was featured. And so that was driving a lot of the sales. So that was awesome. And I was really excited. And so that really helped to motivate me to continue to pitch more outlets like that. And then shortly after WGN had reached out to me, they saw me on Instagram, and they wanted to interview me and bring me on to their morning radio show. And so I want to WGN’s radio show. And honestly, like I didn’t expect a lot to happen because it’s it’s radio and I personally don’t listen to the radio very often. So I didn’t think a lot of people did. And like I was picturing in my head that if people are listening to the radio, they’re probably in the car and like not ready to buy like you can’t just be driving and then hear of this product and you’re not going to pull over on the side of the highway to make a purchase. So I figured when people got to their destination, they probably would have forgotten about it. And that’s it. So I went on this radio show, I was a super cool experience. I didn’t expect anything to happen. I expected maybe a spike in sales like Business Insider, but I had very low expectations. And that day officially like changed flight fillow. Just because I got off air. I didn’t even make it out of the building yet. So this is like less than 10 minutes. And I open the app and just saw so many sales, like way more sales than like an entire like holiday season. And then I’m heading home and I keep checking the app. And it just kept going and going for the rest of the day and for like days after I was getting so many emails from listeners that said, Hey, like I heard you on WGN, it was amazing. And in less than five days flight fillow completely sold out of products. And I never imagined that to happen. So that moment, like, definitely showed me the power of PR. And it was also just like very reassuring that like, I have a product that people want, like if people are hearing me on the radio just for a few minutes, and now I’m sold out like, Whoa, okay. So it was definitely like, proof of concept. It gave me that confidence that I needed. It definitely gave me that drive to like, go out there and try to get more of these opportunities. And it’s crazy, because I didn’t pay anything for WGN I paid for like, I paid to play for some other ones and nothing happened. But then for WGN, that was completely organic. It was free for me when we sold out. So

 

Lexie Smith

I have goose. So I obviously know this story, but our listeners don’t I haven’t already known the story, I still get goose bumps and it makes my PR heart so happy. Because PR does not always work. But when it does, it is the biggest ROI. You said it yourself. You spent zero dollars. So everything you received was a return. So have you reflected back at all on you know, let’s actually break down that opportunity a little more? What was it that what was the format of the interview? was where you storytelling? Were you just talking about your product? Walk us through what that was like?

 

Georgia McKinney

Yeah, so essentially walked on into the radio show, and they just wanted to really, like get to know me. So I think more of the story wasn’t as much of the product as it was behind the scenes so that I work a full time job and that I’m doing this on the side. And then they also wanted to hear about like different experiences. So they wanted to hear like, how did I decided what I was going to price like flight fillows at. And then they also wanted to know about Shark Tank. So I had audition for Shark Tank and made it to the third round of auditions. So they wanted to hear a little bit about that as well. So it wasn’t specifically about the product. It was more of like the story behind it. Which I think is really powerful too. Because when I first launched flight fillow I thought that people want to buy from big companies so I had to fake it till you make it mentality where I didn’t like show behind the scenes I didn’t like I didn’t make it very obvious that it was like a one woman show show putting this on. Um, when I would post on social media and stuff I’d be like we bla bla bla bla, when really I could say I things like that. I just wanted to make it seem like I was an established company that I knew what I was doing. And experiences like WGN and even just kind of being more transparent on social media really showed me that people want to buy from like the person they want to know when they’re buying. Yeah, exactly.

Like, I don’t think people want to actually support like the really big companies like that’s not appealing to them, when they hear the story behind the scenes and they have an image of who it is that they’re supporting. That just makes it so much more special. And so since that since that time and learning about this, I’ve definitely have shown a lot more behind the scenes. I call it like being more vulnerable. I think it’s kind of awkward sometimes putting yourself out there. Because I feel like if people don’t know who I am, if someone told me they hated flight fillow, then I’d be like, Okay, well, you hate flight fellow. But if I put myself out there, and they know all about me and behind the scenes, and then they say they hate flight fillow, then it’s easier for me to take it personally. And so I call it being more vulnerable. But I’ve seen such a return on investment for that, then I’m willing to take that risk and like to put myself out there, just because it’s been way more beneficial than anything else.

 

Lexie Smith

You just gave me my legitimate second set of goosebumps of the show because everything you’re saying I actually not only as a PR professional, but as a business owner can relate to that in my own journey, right when I spent 10 years representing other brands, and I was able to hide behind other brands. So when I didn’t hear back or there was a rejection, I could, you know, compartmentalize that as oh, it’s not fully me. Now with my own brand when I step up and I’m vulnerable, it’s it’s hard to not think of it as a personal rejection. So thank you for calling out and anyone listening that’s so normal to feel that way. Here are two founders you’re hearing right now, who have felt that way. So it sounds like you shared a lot of your founder’s story, which is amazing. So people were connecting with you and people buy from people. You also mentioned Shark Tank, I think you and I are two have a very small percentage of people that understand that world behind the scenes, I would love for you to enlighten the audience on what it was like, how did you apply to Shark Tank? How did you? What does that even I’ll let you take it from here? Yeah.

 

Georgia McKinney

So Shark Tank has been one of my favorite shows since high school. So Well, before I ever thought that I would be an entrepreneur or have a business or any possibility of me being on the show itself. I just love the show in general. And so when I came up with this idea for flight fillow and decided to bring it to market, and things were actually happening with it, I was thinking like, Oh my gosh, like, I love Shark Tank. And I was actually watching Shark Tank to, to learn some stuff about my business, because you get feedback from the sharks. Hear what’s been successful from other small businesses. So I was really watching it more as like homework for myself. But then, you know, I got the idea, like, maybe I’ll apply. So I googled, you know, how to apply for for Shark Tank. And I found this email address for their casting team, because the casting season was like closed when I decided to email them. And I think this was in October or November. So I sent them an email with just the pitch. And you know what, I heard crickets. So I didn’t think anything happened from it. And then it was around January, or February around that timeframe that I got an email back, and they’re saying, like, hey, like, thank you for reaching out, like, can you fill out this questionnaire, so it was a link. And so I went in, and I filled out like this online application. And then crickets again, didn’t hear anything. So then I’m at my corporate job one day, and I get this email from an actual person with Shark Tank and their casting team, and they said, Hey, I would love to have an interview with you about Shark Tank, like, Are you available in 30 minutes?

 

Lexie Smith

And how long was that time gap, by the way, between the crickets, and the first? Oh,

 

Georgia McKinney

A couple months, a couple months. So we’re now we’re now like, in April. So, um, yeah, I got this email. And they asked if they could have a phone interview with me in 30 minutes. And I had pictured, like, if I made it to this phone interview round, that I was gonna be so prepared, I was going to have all these notes in front of me because it’s a phone interview, and they can’t see that. And I just it, I didn’t think I would only have 30 minutes notice. And I was at my corporate job. So it’s not like I could even go home to get ready. So I said yes, because I’m not going to say no to Shark Tank. And I did this phone interview in my car. So I was just so nervous. And I, I just didn’t want to blow it. And so we had the phone interview. And on the phone, he tells me that I’m I made it to the next round. So now I get to go to the third round. And he tells me that I am going to make a video. And I’m like a video audition, where I’m pitching the producers. And that has to be five to 10 minutes, and that they need to receive it physically on a USB with samples of my product in seven days. And so I kind of backwards track this.

And I was like, Alright, if you need it in seven days, and it’s going to take like three days for shipping. That means I have four days to film a video and edit it. And I don’t even know what I’m going to say. So I was panicking. So I went home early from work that day. So I could try to brainstorm. And I i they also tell you that you can’t tell anybody about it. So you are after you make it past this phone interview section. I wanted to like one I wanted to tell the world because I was pretty darn proud of myself. Second of all, I wanted to tell everyone, I could ask for help, like sos. I need help, please help me. But you can’t tell anyone. So my boyfriend and my best friends or my brother, they were the only ones I told so they could help me with the video. And so I remember I gave myself like three days well actually inside four days the first day I was just panicking

 

Lexie Smith

understandable for sure.

 

Georgia McKinney

So then the second day I just they give you a list of questions that they want you to answer during the video. And I at first you think that’s pretty easy, but I started writing out all of my answers to the questions and realize there’s like no way that’s going to fit in a 10 minute video or be like the slightest bit interesting. So I spent the first day like writing just like breaking dumping the answers to the questions. The second day is when we started filming. And I tried to just film a lot of different clips, answering the questions in a ton of different ways. And then the third day was just video editing, trying to figure out how can I make this interesting to watch this 10 minute video not boring? and answer all the questions that they want me to say. And so that’s what we did. And I submitted it. And I shipped it overnight, because I was very scared of it getting lost in the mail. Um, but yeah, so that was the process. About a month later, I didn’t hear back. So I followed up with them. And he was very kind and just let me know that I didn’t make it to the next round. And the next round would have been a live pitch to the producers.

 

Lexie Smith

Well, first off, congratulations, trust me. I mean, thousands and thousands of people apply to that show and never even get it past the first round. So that is a huge accomplishment. I know. It’s a bummer.

You didn’t make it on air. But I still think that’s such a huge, huge win. So kudos, being on that 10 minute mark, just for anyone listening who is a Shark Tank fan. By the way, when you’re on the show Shark Tank, doing your pitch, it’s like 45 minutes. So you’re watching back an edited version. So for them to ask you to basically provide an edited version of what really is a 45 minute pitch. That’s that’s a tall, tall ask for sure.

 

Georgia McKinney

Yeah, definitely. And I have no vivid vivid video editing skills. So I totally thought if I would make it on the, or if I would make it to that round, that I would have had time to hire someone to help me with this video – no time. Right? Yeah. So I had my brother who was in high school at the time helped me out. And, uh, yeah, so he definitely came in, and was so helpful with that I have no idea what I would have done without him. But even then, like, it’s it wasn’t what I had envisioned that none of the process is what I had envisioned, I had envisioned a lot more planning a lot more thought to things, but um, I, I read a lot of books from the sharks. And I found out that they do a lot of that on purpose. If they don’t give you time to prepare, and they put you on the spot. That’s when they get the best content.

 

Lexie Smith

Yeah, it’s a lot of Hurry up and wait. And I’ll I know, I almost thank you for sharing that. Because now for anyone listening, they have a little bit more an idea of what they can expect if they’re going through the process. So, you know, start thinking about video and B roll before you even apply. Sounds like a wise decision. So bringing it back to overall PR, you have decided to embark on the DIY PR journey. Yeah, for any founder listening, who that even concept sounds so far off, where does one even start? What is the first thing you should do? Before you quote unquote, DIY PR?

 

Georgia McKinney

Well, the first thing that I do is I use Trello. And in Trello, I have a bunch of different like templates. So when I first started DIYing PR I really wanted just like one template that I could send to everybody. And I tried it. But I know that doesn’t work. And actually being on the receiving end of some of those has really shown me that because as a as a business owner, we get pitched a lot to for various services.

And sometimes I open an email and I just know that it’s like very like generic, they’re probably sending 1000 of these a day. Sometimes I don’t even finish reading it and I definitely don’t reply to those. But then when I get pitched as a business owner, and I can tell it was personalized and someone did research, even if I’m not interested, I at least respond because I know it’s a human on the other other end. And so I took that like lesson and have put that into my pitches. Now I still try to do some form of a template so I don’t have to reinvent the wheel and think from scratch every time. So I have probably at least a dozen different templates. like okay, is it a gift guide? Am I trying to pitch flight fillow for plane travel Am I trying to pitch flight fillow for road trips, am I trying to pitch it for camping? So I have a few different things. I have a post pandemic travel one right now, where I really focus on how flight fillow is washable. You can wash it in between each of your flights and have a clean start or you don’t have to put it on the outside of your suitcase it can fit in your backpack or your pocket so you don’t have to worry about what your flight fillow is touching before it touches your face. So, I have a bunch of different templates. But even when I do go to pitch, I personalize it, I try to find out their name. If I can find out the company, I do some research, I find an article that I’m interested in, I try to do at least minimal research. So they can open it and know that it’s not a robot that is sending mass emails. I use HARO, which has helped a reporter out, I browse it every single day. And I just go for I just see like, what are things that are applicable that I’m interested in, and then I send my pitches. Usually, I get three emails from them a day. And usually in the evenings, I’ll sit down, and then I’ll send out pitches to relevant queries. And most of the time, I don’t hear back, which is just it’s very normal. I probably say maybe like one out of 15 I hear back. But it’s helped a lot. And when I first started, I was only getting featured and like really small publications, like bloggers and stuff, which I know a lot of people say that they just want to aim really high and get for the name brand ones. But getting a lot getting a handful of bloggers to blog about it has helped too, because you kind of get this credibility under your wing. So when I’m pitching, the higher ones, I can say that we were featured in multiple publications, right and stuff like that. And then that helps too, because if somebody else is googling, so let’s say I pitch on Business Insider, and then they see the name, if they Google Fillow Fillow they’ll see that like a bunch of other people have written about it too. And I think that really helps because people want to like write about something that other people are excited about.

 

Lexie Smith

So you are a star student, I’m just beaming over here. I second everything she just said it is 100% quality over quantity. We can also drop the link to HARO in the notes, it is a free service. If you guys want to learn more about that. Reach out to me or stalk my website. I have articles on it. That being said, Georgia, we’ve talked about pitching This is the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast you briefly told that told us that was one of your passions earlier. I want to end by asking you what are you sippin’? What is your favorite beverage? It can be alcoholic or non alcoholic. . So I just saw sorry, what are you drinking?

 

Georgia McKinney

Oh, a truly strawberry lemonade. Um, so it’s like, um, it’s kind of like your seltzer waters that everybody’s into, but they have the lemonade version. And so my little brother, he, he told me about it. And so I was like, oh, okay, I’ll give it a try. I don’t really like truly just like itself. But I like the lemonade. So.

 

Lexie Smith

Okay, that’s interesting, because since we’re talking about sensors real quick, I like very specific, like black cherry white claw. I like mango Bud Light seltzer. I haven’t found a truly flavor yet. So you said strawberry lemonade.

 

Georgia McKinney

Yes. And I tried the lemonade one the other day. And it was like a very bitter lemonade, which I actually kind of liked. But it makes sense because it’s low carb and low sugar. So they can’t throw a bunch of sugar into it. Right. But have you tried ranch water before? No. Okay, so I just moved to Texas, and it’s kind of a big one in Texas. And so it’s your sparkling water and they put tequila in it instead of vodka.

And then they sweeten it with agave. And so I tried it yesterday for the first time and it’s kind of interesting. It definitely gave me way more of a buzz than a regular truly does, I think is because I’m just weak sauce and the tequila, like got me more than that vodka does. But it was definitely interesting. So I would try that if you can find that. All right, what’s

 

Lexie Smith

it called again?

 

Georgia McKinney

It’s called ranch water.

 

Lexie Smith

ranch water. I’m 100% writing that down. And on that note, you know, we’re coming to we’re out of time here. So I just want to thank you for for hopping on here today and sharing with us your experience the good, the bad, the reality of it all. The last thing I want to end with is if people want to learn more about flight fillow where can they go?

 

Georgia McKinney

And they can go to www.flightfillow.com. We are also available on amazon prime and you can follow me on Instagram to see all the behind the scenes because I’m very vulnerable now. And I’m not just @flightfillow and it’s f i l l o w like a fillable billable pillow. Perfect. Thank

 

Lexie Smith

you so much Georgia.

 

Georgia McKinney

Thank you

 

Lexie Smith

Hey guys, if you are enjoying the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast, please do me a huge favor and leave a review wherever you are listening. If you want to connect with me to learn more about THEPRBAR inc, you can do so on Instagram @THEPRBAR_inc or you can check out my website at THEPRBARinc.com Cheers!

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