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PR Couture with Crosby Noricks – Podcast Transcript

 

PR Pro: PR Couture, The Cost of PR + Thai Tea Lattes with Crosby Noricks

SPEAKERS

Lexie Smith, Crosby Noricks

 

 

Lexie Smith

Hey guys Lexie here, travel enthusiast, lover of puns, pizza and wine connoisseur and the founder of THEPRBAR inc. and you’re tuning in to the pitching and sipping podcast, from behind the scenes interviews with the media, to honest conversations with other PR pros to a look at inspiring brands and entrepreneurs that are rocking the world of PR, in this podcast, we talked tips while taking sips, and talking about all the things that make those and the world of PR tick. Let’s get started.

 

Today we are talking with Crosby Noricks who is the Founder of PR Couture – the industry-leading career platform and sourcebook for communication professionals ready to lead with authority and get paid accordingly. Crosby’s vision, expertise and accessibility have allowed her to educate, mentor and support individuals and brands internationally, for more than a decade. With a resume full of 4-figure paid speaking gigs, more than 100 articles and podcast wins, international award-winning programs and workshops, consistently sold-out agency masterminds, and even her own book, in Todays episode Crosby and I talk about the realities of what it costs to hire a PR agency, how from an insider perspective it can be really difficult to price services, how to set realistic expectations as a business owner with PR, and how a strong pr strategy involves so more than just media relations. She gives us her top tips, and of course, we end by finding out her favorite daily sips.

 

So I think I first learned about PR Couture through the Pitch, Please Facebook group, however, don’t quote me on that, because it could have been the other way around. Regardless, when I think of a go to PR resource to refer to people, PR Couture is always on the top of my list. So we’re gonna talk about what exactly that is soon. But first Crosby welcome, I would love to learn a little bit more about who you are outside of the office, where is home base, do you have any hobbies, hidden talents, all the fun stuff.

 

Crosby Noricks

Thank you so much. I live in San Diego. I have lived here now for a very long time, did not anticipate that being where home base was going to be. But I live here now with my partner and I have a four year old son. We live in a cute little Spanish bungalow with a white picket fence. Somehow we stumbled into that – dog and a cat. And I spend most of my time working working is you know, a creative outlet for me, it feels creative when you’re running your own business. And the only limitations are, you know what your own brain can come up with, I actually find that really energizing. But when I am not, when I’m not doing that when I’m trying to turn off screens and whatnot. I do read a lot, I have a sort of guilty pleasure around paranormal, teen fiction, no one can read in mass on the Kindle. And I also you know, living in San Diego, being able to go to the beach, being able to get out into the forest. It’s been a little bit tough this year. But just having access to so many different sort of types of nature and being able to get there really quickly is something that I love. And so I do try to prioritize a little bit of time at the ocean. And then what did you say hidden talents. Um, I used to be a somewhat competitive, traditional Irish dancer. And so that’s always a fun little hidden talent to bring out at parties and whatnot. So I can actually dance a jag, sort of river dance style. That’s really the only one that is coming to mind.

 

Lexie Smith

That’s amazing. Have you been to Ireland?

 

Crosby Noricks

I spent a week in Dublin a long time ago during my study abroad. In college. I have not been back since I was really cold. Yeah, it was so beautiful. And I wish that I had been able to spend more time in the country as opposed to being in the city. The draw for the Irish dancing really, for me was about the amazing dresses. And a friend of mine did it and I went to her like a, you know, a show that she was putting on and was like, What do I have to do to get a velvet dress with unicorn with like iridescent unicorns embroidered onto it. Like what? What and so I stopped doing was doing like jazz and modern and all these different things and really went all in on on Irish dancing through through high school, and then even did it as an adult. I found a place here in San Diego that has adult dancing and did that and competed a little bit in a in what’s called an eight hands like eight other women or seven other women and myself. And so yeah, it’s been a big part of it’s been a big part of my Yeah, my downtime, time has always been dancing. And in particular, the Irish dancing.

 

Lexie Smith

I love that so much. I’ve I feel like however, the times I have seen Irish dancers is at a St. Patty’s Day celebration. So I have some libations in me that just always it’s hard for me to not join because it’s so fun. Well, I

 

Crosby Noricks

know, we used to be able to take St. Patrick’s Day Off of school, which is very fun. And then I was living in the Bay Area and we would go and dance it you know different pubs and different events that day.

So it was always a very fun day. For me just the excuse to actually take a day off school and go dance around in San Francisco is always really fun.

 

Lexie Smith

I love that that’s such a good party trick or hidden talent. I love that probably one of my favorites on the show so far. So that’s a good one. And I couldn’t agree with you more as an entrepreneur, your business does become a lot of your hobbies. So before we get we’re going to talk about PR Couture but talk us about your career prior talk us through what came before and what led to now.

 

Crosby Noricks

I have had PR Couture as a URL as a site since 2006. So there’s very little of my career that did not include having PR Couture as the kind of proverbial side hustle. However, before I started that site, what was I doing? I went to graduate school for communication. I, I graduated from college, a couple of months before September 11, it was not the best time for a girl to go get her, you know, shiny, fancy post college job. I was living in LA, you know, interviewing, trying to figure all of that out, and wasn’t really getting anywhere. In the field that I want it to be in at that time, which was really entertainment. And it was really kind of a struggle, and I love school. And so I was like, I’m just gonna go back to school, right? I wanted that answer when people said, like, what are you doing with your life, and I’d graduated with this like, combined major with honors and had all these like, high aspirations of getting my like, fancy rom com style job, and it just wasn’t really happening. So going back to school felt like a really good answer. I moved to San Diego to do graduate school. And it was so interesting, you know, I had been applying and applying, not really getting very far, I had moved to Barcelona for a while, got my TEFL to speak English, or to teach English as a second language, I ended up doing a little bit more shopping than really anything. And eventually it kind of ran out of money and had to come home, I worked at a hair salon doing some like event work, but it was basically just a crazy receptionist job with, you know, three phones and scheduling and all this crazy stuff. While I kind of figured out what my next move was, and so I came in for grad school. And after all of that struggle, I think I applied I found a random Craigslist ad for a product copywriter went in, interviewed and got this amazing opportunity for an online jewelry company. Originally just to write product copy, we had, you know, thousands of skews. And so that was really the beginning. But within my first week, the the graphic designer, like email newsletter guy quit. And so I started to do that the CEO of the company had recently come back from doing desk sides in New York, and we had all these really great new editor contacts. And so a lot of PR opportunities were coming in. So I took on that. And very quickly, I had, you know, I was really running the in house, PR and marketing for this for this jewelry company. And I did that while I was in grad school for you know, for the next two years before transitioning to working for an agency. And it was really the the sort of combination of that, you know, kind of jewelry PR intro and my graduate program where and I found public relations and realize that this potentially would be a career for me, that inspired me to create a little fashion PR focused blog called PR Couture that has since evolved and grown and 14 years later is my you know is my deal. It’s it’s the it’s the focus of what I do.

 

Lexie Smith

perfect segue. Okay, so now i’m sure everyone’s been going what is PR Couture? Enlighten us… Tell us what it is today?

 

Crosby Noricks

Yeah, so this is something you know, I’m always tweaking the language of it, you know, and even having to take a step back and and check in around what what is this latest iteration, right, so the latest iteration, we have, we are now focused less on fashion PR explicitly, even a little bit less on kind of the lifestyle space. So that’s really our core. So we typically have shown up for written about, chronicled celebrated, worked with lifestyle, PR professionals predominantly. And and now we have really opened it up to be a resource and platform for communication professionals who are a little bit more on the entrepreneurial side. So even if they have a job, they’re often the ones who are, you know, kind of leaders by default, or they have a desire to go out on their own or they’ve already done that. And so we’re really there as sort of a modern trade organization and kind of a way to help practitioners from first internship through to the day that they reach that, you know, six figure milestone on their consulting business or they hire their first employee or, you know, whatever that is, we really want to be there and to be able to provide some measure of support and direction and community through the entire sort of life cycle of one’s career. That’s a big vision, right? That’s a big kind of coming in and trying to solve some of the major challenges of an entire industry, right? It’s no small feat. And I think what I have continually looked to do is either by niche, or by coming up with our own sort of spin on traditional, you know, kind of professional development is create a space that feels really genuine, that’s really relatable and down to earth, but does not, you know, that isn’t is none of this sort of like smoke and mirrors, and also really flips a lot of our, you know, everything’s kind of behind the curtain of a lot of what public relations has had to be, because it’s such a competitive space, and instead said, we think that we all have something really valuable to share, no matter where you’re at in your journey. This is a place where we pull back the curtain and we say, this is what’s working, this is not what’s working, this is where we all get tripped up, when we’re doing bold. We’re taking bold moves in our career, this is how the industry is changing. This is how we can more effectively lead the conversation with our clients as opposed to letting them sort of take the lead and have us just in this service based, give, give, give, give give to burn out kind of place. And I’ve now you know, been working closely with PR professionals, communication professionals, you know, social media, strategist, conversion copywriters, etc. And most of what I’m doing personally, right now is much more on the coaching side than it is on than it than anything. And we remain really one of a handful of businesses that are really out there supporting the practitioner, versus teaching, you know, PR skills or strategies to a small business owner or doing service, you know, done for you services.

 

Lexie Smith

Right. And well, first off, I do feel like you have accomplished that goal, because that’s what I associate with PR Couture. Truly I do. And I think it’s a very unique community. And really cool I’m I’m very much about all things collaboration. And you’re so right, there is a sense, there really, especially a few years ago, a sense of competition. And as that’s why when once again, that pitch, please Facebook group entered my radar however it did I was I was I found it very refreshing. And I’ve met many professionals through your community, we will come back to that because I know everyone wants to know how to join. But first, let’s talk about a little PR. So I was perusing your website deciding what exactly I wanted to talk with you about since obviously, we could go a million different ways. And the first thing that I did was read your home page banner, which reads quote, PR Couture is the industry leading platform for communication professionals ready to lead with authority and get paid accordingly. So I want to focus on that last part, get paid accordingly. The question I have will be both helpful to those working in the PR industry, but also those looking to potentially hire someone. So what are you seeing as an average PR agency retainer these days? I know that it can differ, but I’d love to hear your observations.

 

Crosby Noricks

Yeah, it’s such an interesting, it’s such an interesting question. Because pricing is so weird, right? Like pricing is so it’s such a challenge. We have, you know, kind of industry, industry, industry pricing, you know, in sort of some broad buckets, which I can speak to. And then we also have, you know, you you as the individual, as the agency owner are trying to figure out what feels like an equitable, a sort of exchange of money for expertise. Right. And that comes with all sorts of, you know, potential mindset challenges. And it’s sort of like it’s just an ongoing sort of conversation that we all have to have consistently in our businesses. Does this feel good because the danger of you know, underpricing, your services, allowing clients to dictate how much things cost, you know, somebody comes in and says they have $1,000, and you’re like, well, I don’t want to turn away $1,000. So let me figure out a way to make this work. The result of that is often that you end up feeling resentful of your clients, you have low energy, you’re not excited to accomplish the task. And the truth of the matter is that the expectations of that thousand dollar client often, often are are more intense than the expectations of a higher ticket client, truly because partially because a smaller business with smaller budget to play with has a heightened sense of fear and concern around wanting to make sure that their budget is being used appropriately. So they’re in your inbox all the time, they’re they’re texting, they’re asking for the result, the result, the result, as opposed to a different type of business that maybe has worked with an agency in the past kind of knows, knows the drill, and trusts you to be the true expert and is a little bit more hands off, which allows you to then do your best work. So I will say that broadly, I am still seeing the kind of standard entry boutique agency retainer out about 2500. That is about the bare minimum, if you look at, you know, the if if you’re pricing it according to hourly, or your which you know, has its pros and cons, or you’re pricing it according to sort of the results and how that how those results impact the bottom line. Regardless, we’ve got this kind of like 2500, monthly retainer. And, you know, some people of course go a little bit lower, some people go a little bit higher. That has been true that 2500 Mark has been true in the 10 plus years that I have had, you know, deep insight into what people are what people are charging, and hasn’t really changed. And, and it often is, it’s it’s a challenging price point. Because you can have, you know, five clients at 2500. And that’s a huge amount of client management, that is happening, that’s a lot of sort of like juggling, and keeping track. And, you know, doing doing the work day in and day out, and doesn’t really translate. When you look at, you know, the expenses of a typical small business or bringing on a team that does not give you a pretty, like a very strong like profit margin. So so it can be a little bit of tough at that 2500 mark. But for a lot of smaller brands like that’s, that’s what feels most comfortable. And that seems to work. Next stage, you know, you’re looking at like, anywhere in like the four to 6K. And that always to me feels like okay, now we have a little bit of room. Now we can really not just, you know, be sending out this, you know, this pitch and that pitch, but we can look long term, we can really think about where this brand is going, we can really think about the message and the legacy and the imprint of this brand, we can start to have a little bit more conversation or impact around the like owned media that we’re creating or the partnerships that we’re going after. And then you know, and then beyond that we have our kind of like seven to 10 k retainer, which is typically, you know, when you get to more of a mid sized agency or you know, more of that, like enterprise level 10K is usually their minimum, so they will not take on clients for less than a 10k retainer. And those Yeah, those numbers I’ve seen stay pretty steady through the last decade.

 

Lexie Smith

It’s it’s an interesting question, because I have worked in agency, I’ve also worked in house and when I worked in house, sometimes I hired agencies and the pricing that I would receive. Now I’ve never received a $2500. But the five to 15. mark was always the range, which I saw. And then you talk about when let’s let’s talk about this actually, how long of a retainer are you typically roped into? And then from the business owners standpoint, when can they actually start to see some results? Are they going to pay, you know, that first five K or 2500 month and they’re going to see results that month? Or? You know, again, it depends, but when we talk about average expectations, what’s an average retainer these days? And what should people be setting their expectations for in terms of how quickly things are going to get going?

 

Crosby Noricks

Yeah, so I don’t typically recommend a retainer agreement that’s less than six months, because of the nature of PR, because it is a long term strategy because it is incremental because it you know, it builds in on itself, because things can take longer than you expect. Because clients can change direction because you’re, you know, things can things can pop in you might have, you know, an incredible opportunity. And then like the strategy needs to needs to switch. Right. And so we want to feel like there’s a commitment on both sides. Right? Anything that is like a three month you know, I mean, I think if you’re specifically hired, you know, just to do Media Relations, maybe you’re just hired to do holiday pitching. Depending on where you’re at in your business, that might make sense. Sure, you might take on a three month project because you know that this product is really compelling, you have the existing editor relationships, you’re pretty sure you can make it happen. But I encourage all of us in the communication space to really think of ourselves less as these like one trick, kind of like Media Relations ponies. And instead to really think of ourselves as strategic communication advisors that are at that executive table that are driving brand messaging, that are able to report back and to be this sort of like liaison and mediator between the goals and objectives, sort of from the top down, and what the audience is really looking for, and what what is going to be meaningful to the audience. And that is far more than the simple act, not that it’s simple. But the, you know, the theoretically simple act of like, name in Article photograph in editor’s picks, right. And particularly in this day and age, when so much is happening and shifting with our with our traditional media, there are fewer and a lot of cases, depending on your vertical, there are simply fewer places to pitch, there are more freelance writers who are having to do their own pitching, the entire sort of editorial model is moving far more to a paid model. I am now ranting on, on the you know, on the on this sort of like idea of just taking on specifically like Media Relations, heavy work. So you know, it can work in certain scenarios, right. Um, but I think the other thing to think about with those expectations is helping clients to understand that you were there for far more than to simply get them into the press. The challenge with the press piece is it’s like, Yay, that’s great. And like now what’s next. And that’s a really exhausting way to operate. You know, you’re doing all of these different things, the magical stars have to align the opportunity and the trend, and the, you know, the editor and the you know, all of it has to like, you know, all the stars have to magically align for that process to happen. And then it’s like, that’s great. What’s next, like very westwing, right, like, what’s next, like, that’s great, thanks so much. Let’s, let’s go bigger, let’s go more, more, more, more, more, more, more. And so it’s really valuable to start talking about the ways that you can support a brand and a company that are beyond just that simple, sort of like transactional or like toolbox piece of publicity. So six months, minimum annual is better in terms of expectations, you know, I think that we should know that, you know, clients are going to want to see quick results. And so we should think about what are those places where we can get some quick results and some quick traction, a lot of times that’s, you know, short leads. So if you can get a couple of mentions here and there. Again, it always comes down to those those editor relationships, those writer relationships, can you call up somebody who’s a colleague slash friend and say, hey, I’ve got this really great story, I’ve got this really great opportunity, like, can you know, can we place it somewhere versus cold pitching, not having those relationships, it’s a much more challenging mountain to climb up. So I do think it’s you should be thinking in your in your execution, even through the pitch process? Do I feel confident that in the first, you know, in the first eight weeks, we can start to see some movement or some traction or some real opportunity? Can we think about what are the KPIs beyond again, that press piece that we could start to look at our website visits going up? is social following going up? are, you know, are we getting more inquiries from you know, from stores who want to carry the product? Are we getting more inquiries from partners? Did the CEO get asked to speak at a conference because of a thought leadership piece that we got published, so really thinking about it f rom a much more, I guess, holistic perspective. But but we need to expect that that’s the expectation, right? Like, as business owners ourselves, it is scary to give a bunch of money to someone and trust that they are going to that they’re going to that they’re going to if not give you like a direct ROI, you’re going to be able you feel confident that that person is representing you well is is proactively seeking out opportunities for you cares, at least as much about your business as you know, 50% of yourself, because we never, you know, nobody ever cares the way that we care. But to really understand that like, that’s a that’s a huge investment. And that’s trust and belief in someone else. And so we need to figure out a way to solve for that and to make them feel like they made the right decision. And yeah, some quickie press hits are a really great way to do that.

 

Lexie Smith

A great way you’re making my heart so happy because I preach left, right center, all the places about how PR is so much more than just Media Relations. And it really is this holistic thing. And I would say nine times out of 10. Don’t Don’t quote me on that people come to people in PR, just wanting those big name drops. When if you take a step back, that’s actually not always the smartest strategy to help them achieve their objectives. So, yes, yes, yes. And yes to everything you’re saying. That being said, I, no matter how much I preach that I still have people wanting to understand how to land press. So give me some quick, your best PR tips when it comes to pitching Do’s, Don’ts, whatever you you would like to share?

 

Crosby Noricks

Yeah, well, I think you know, to that point, clients come, businesses come and they, you know, they want they want these logos. They want these placements. Sometimes it’s because their competitor did and they want to be there. Sometimes it’s because they have a lifelong dream to be featured in this magazine. Sometimes it’s because they have a mistake and understate expectation that like you get an X magazine, and you’re gonna sell out.

And really, I think the most critical question to ask yourself before you start pitching is like, is, I guess it’s kind of like the like, why should anyone give a shit? Question? Yes, actually interesting or novel or newsworthy? About what it is that you are doing? And if you are not doing anything particularly interesting, why would we expect somebody to be interested in what we’re doing? Right? That that idea of like, if you want people to be interested, be interesting. If you want to inspire, you know, the curiosity and interest of an audience, be willing to stand for something, have a device of opinion, create marketing, that is a little bit disruptive. Do something upside down from the way that it has always been done, right, give us something that makes us curious, tease us a little bit, you know, in the marketing, like do something that is worthwhile. Once you have done that, you not only have you know, the standalone product or service, but you have the ability to pitch the entire approach and the culture and the belief system and the value system, you have so many more opportunities. And so I think that that’s, that’s always like, step one is, is there is there anything here, and then the challenge becomes, you know, the publicist knows that there isn’t really anything here. And so she encourages the client, what can we do? Can we start a movement? Can we do a campaign? Can we, you know, I don’t know, send out really interesting, we send out a really interesting mailer, can we surprise people? Can we do something, you know, out and about in the world? Can we film that, you know, what do give me something to work with. And unfortunately, oftentimes, there’s a real lack of willingness to, to do something, you know, we expect that Oh, like the product supposed to sell itself, or the service sells itself. Or, of course, they’re into, you know, there’s just, there’s a disconnect there. So if you don’t have anything, particularly, you know, quote, unquote, newsworthy, you have two options. One is you create something, you give people an excuse, you create a platform, you create a conversation, you do something, or you figure out something that is already being done a conversation that is already happening in the media, something that’s happened in popular culture, a conversation that, you know, kind of people are having an emerging trend are sort of like swell in the consciousness of, you know, your consumer, and you, you know, you hop onto that you get on that horse, and you explain to the editor, why this particular product or service has, you know, is is worth considering in the container of, you know, whatever the bigger story is, so, those are kind of like, my, my two top and then it’s, you know, and then it’s all the standard best practices of like, you know, do your research be succinct. This is not an opportunity to, you know, tell somebody’s life story. This is this is a transactional, you know, form of communication. This is like, here’s my idea, here’s why I think it’s compelling. Here’s how I’d like us to move forward. Are you in or are you out, you know, in a in a really like, soft, in a soft sell kind of a way, in a confident way. Um, versus, you know, here’s but you know, seven, eight, paragraphs of this or that are like, here’s the sob story of the you know, the, you know, the rags to riches, CEO story, whatever like that can all come after, but you have to capture the editor attention and you have to give them a reason, not only why they should be interested but why their readership should be interested.

And that’s, that requires a level of like, strategy and inquiry and critical thinking, that is not just Hey, we have these hoop earrings, they’re $19. Right? I’d love to send you over a sample. You know, I’d love to send you over a sample. You know, I mean, there’s there’s that kind of like product based pitching, but right to really to really do it. Well, you know, you want to have really rich coverage. And I think yeah, that’s how you do it.

 

Lexie Smith

Yeah, why? Why should they give a shit? I think that’s, that’s amazing. And, um, I have one more fun question. And then I would love you to tell everyone where they can connect with you and learn more about your community. This is called the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast, so at the end of every episode, I love to ask, What are you sipping? So what is your favorite beverage be alcoholic, non alcoholic? I love hearing what people have to say.

 

Crosby Noricks

Um man, I like my favorite beverage of all time as a Thai iced tea. Okay, I think Thai tea is the most delicious thing I’ve ever tasted.

 

Lexie Smith

From a specific brand?

 

Crosby Noricks

No, you know, like just when you’re picking out like when you’re getting like Thai takeout. Just the Thai iced tea is always really fun. I don’t have them quite often enough. You know, because it’s basically like a sugar dessert in a cup. But and then other than that, I would probably just say, you know, coffee, coffee Look, I look forward to my coffee every morning. And probably drink far more of it than the water that I’m supposed to be drinking.

 

Lexie Smith

Right? Well I’ve right next to me coffee and water, which is the water is harder for me to remember then that coffee. It’s fun, easy Thai iced tea. We have a local Thai restaurant near us. And every single time that sweet little delivery man delivers my husband, a complimentary Thai iced tea and hey, yeah, so, so great.

 

Crosby Noricks

Yeah.

 

Lexie Smith

Okay, so now, tell us where can people learn more about PR couture? Where can they connect with you? And do you have anything real quick that you want everyone to know about? That might be coming up now or soon?

 

Crosby Noricks

Absolutely. It’s interesting that you keep referencing the Facebook group because I actually was very hesitant for years to create a Facebook group, and finally said, Okay, fine, and did it and you know, now we’ve got 2000 people in there, it’s so wonderful to see people connecting with, with everyone. And, you know, even far more than, you know, email, you feel like you’re emailing into a void, right. And, you know, on social, there’s a there’s, you know, we never, we never know how many people are going to see anything, even with, you know, best practices in mind. And a little bit that happens in the group. But I’m so grateful that I that I listened to that piece of advice and created pitch, please. So the two best places to start prcouture.com. There’s a start here button. Depending on if you are entry level, if you’re a PR Pro, if you’re more on the agency or freelance side, we also have pitch please, which is our free Facebook community. You can either search pitch, please or it’s just Facebook slash group slash PR couture, in terms of what we are working on. So December marks our 14th year of existence, and our one year anniversary of our membership, which is called the coterie. It’s a coaching collective and sort of business incubator for communication consultants. And so that’s very exciting. As part of that, and us opening the doors to the PR Couture Council, which is our annual mastermind for boutique agency owners, we are going to be putting on a one day summit. We did a survey recently. And as ever, the biggest took that by the way. Thank you very much. The biggest piece of feedback, people always want more mentorship and more support. So what we are doing with our summit is we’re actually allowing our community to give back to our community. So the summit is going to actually feature the expertise and support of members of our team members who are in our current mastermind and membership so that everyone can really get a sense of like who are the actual people that make up the peer control community beyond just coffee. So that is going to be on December 11. So depending on when this runs, there might be things out already. We’ll see It is called the power move senate and it’ll be on December 11. And, you know, after years of being, you know, you should do a conference, you should do a conference, I wish we could do a conference, can you do a multi city tour of like dinners and you know, all of these big plans, this feels like a, this felt like the right time and the right moment to start that a little bit but doing that virtual, so we’ve never done a full day’s worth of programming before. So I’m right in the planning stages right now, I love a good new project. So I’m having so much fun, building that all out and getting all of that together. So if you are interested in spending some time with us, the summit coming up will be a really great way to just learn from so many incredible minds in the communication space, and I’m really excited about it.

 

Lexie Smith

So much. First off, congratulations. So many exciting things happening 14 years is incredible. And rare. Honestly, some says these days like to

 

Crosby Noricks

say that we’re vintage, or like vintage internet at this point, because of it. Yeah,

 

Lexie Smith

yeah, you’re a staple. And I’m just so grateful that you You came on today and everyone listening you can obviously tell that Crosby has a wealth of knowledge. So this is just the tip of the iceberg. I am going to let you get back to all the million things you’re working on. But just wanted to say thank you. Thank you again for joining us today.

 

Crosby Noricks

I’m so appreciative of the invitation. It’s always so fun. Yeah. Thank you.

 

Lexie Smith

Hey guys, if you are enjoying the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast, please do me a huge favor and leave a review wherever you are listening. If you want to connect with me to learn more about THEPRBAR inc, you can do so on Instagram @THEPRBAR_inc or you can check out my website at THEPRBARinc.com Cheers!

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