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Creating an Annual News Cycle & Lookbook for Your Brand with PR Pro Carolyn Sutton – Podcast Transcript

Creating an Annual News Cycle & Lookbook for Your Brand with PR Pro Carolyn Sutton

Episode 35 – Creating an Annual News Cycle & Lookbook for Your Brand with PR Pro Carolyn Sutton – Podcast Transcript

SPEAKERS

Lexie Smith, Carolyn Sutton

Lexie Smith

Hey guys! I’m Lexie Smith, travel enthusiast, lover of puns, pizza and wine, PR Coach and founder of THEPRBAR inc., and you’re tuning in to the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ Podcast. Today we’re talking with PR Pro Carolyn Sutton, Founding President of Carolyn Sutton PR, a boutique public relations firm specializing in local and national lifestyle clients, and Brand Your Brand™, a content creation company that creates meaningful, styled content for clients and brands across the country. With more than 18 years of public relations experience, Carolyn and her team go beyond the typical newsroom for stories by utilizing social media, bloggers, brand partnerships, relationships, and both online and traditional media to ensure each client’s story is told on multiple levels. Her clients have appeared in outlets such as Good Morning America, Bon Appetit, Family Circle, InStyle,The Oprah Magazine, Parenting, Real Simple, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Today Show, and many more.  In today’s episode Carolyn walks us through annual news cycles, specifically how they work, and how you can create one of your own, what general lead times are in the world of lifestyle PR, she schools us on lookbooks, how she personally generates relationships with the media, and reminds us to never discount the power of local press. And now without further ado, let’s get to the show. So Carolyn coming into my life and inbox was divine timing when I received her pitch for the show. I literally that day had been looking for someone to speak on the topic of today’s episode. And there she was a glorious unicorn ready to deliver yet another reason why I love working with fellow publicists. So Carolyn, thank you for being a unicorn. Welcome to the show. We have so much to get into today. But first, where in the world are you located?

Carolyn Sutton 

Thank you, Lexie. I’m so excited to be here. I am based in Omaha, Nebraska. And I am recording this from what I call my satellite office up in Michigan right now.

Lexie Smith 

Is Michigan like a home away from home? Second, second home?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes, we come up here in the summers, we go to Northern Michigan and a little town called Leland and my kids are of such age that they are off doing all the things and I can be up here and I can work and it is a beautiful summer to be up here.

Lexie Smith 

Okay, so how many kids and what are the ages?

Carolyn Sutton 

So I have a 12 and a half year old daughter. She is your classic firstborn, very responsible. My middle child my daughter. And then I also have my son and he’s the youngest. And he’s seven.

Lexie Smith 

7 to 12. So you are busy.

Carolyn Sutton 

Very busy, but it’s a really good spot to be my oldest can finally babysit. That is a great stage of life.

Lexie Smith  

Beautiful. I was talking to the other day irrelevant. But I had a PE teacher in fourth grade who had me babysit her baby during staff meetings and I was doing the math how old you are in fourth grade to entrust your baby to are you not so. Are any of them in fourth grade?

Carolyn Sutton 

My my middle is almost 10 and she’s going to be in fourth grade and yeah, I mean, I suppose she could sit there and watch it watch a baby but I think sometimes parents are desperate and they’ll take they’ll take it.

Lexie Smith 

I was laughing I think I got like five bucks for the hour. It was great. But anyways, I so you have a family. What are some of the things that like light you up outside of work?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes. So I love to be active. I would say my number one thing is being as active as possible. We do all the things from running. I love running. I love walking I love working out I love pilates, especially up here in the summer we are doing paddle ball golf, tennis, all of those things and then in my kind of downtime I love to needlepoint is for good for just really relaxing and kind of shutting my brain off and reading as much reading as I can possibly do. And try a horse I love Love, love love to travel.

Lexie Smith 

So book what type of reading?

Carolyn Sutton 

Gosh, I do everything I just finished um, I will do super nonfiction. And then I go very light fluffy beach reads anything World War Two I’m into and I will read anything and everything I can get my hands on.

Lexie Smith 

Not to put you on the spot. But to put you on the spot any any favorite favorite books that are coming Top of Mind in this exact moment that you would suggest?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yeah, one of my favorites is the The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah And then I just finished her follow up one for wins, which is also so good. And I always This is my fun little my fun little random tip is if you haven’t read a Daniel steel book, you need to read one they she is a old school writer, but she still writes really fun books and I like to pop one in every now and then.

Lexie Smith 

So Nightingale, the nightingale a big time reader as well. So that was a selfish question on. Okay, so now let’s kind of shift gears and talk about your career. You have your own firm. So can you please tell everyone? What is your firm and what it is that you guys do?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes, so my firm is Carolyn Sutton PR. And this month, actually it is 12 years I’ve had my firm, and we do lifestyle and consumer public relations. And recently I have also launched a secondary company that is called brand your brand, which is a content creation firm. And they both just work really in tandem together because with PR with the type of consumer PR clients that we work with. It is crucial to have continuous content from a photography to videography. So it’s really comes in hand in hand. So it is busy and wonderful and keeps us connected with clients. We have clients across the country, from small businesses to larger companies, mostly in the lifestyle consumer space.

Lexie Smith 

So lifestyle PR I actually used to work for a lifestyle PR firm once upon a time. It’s what brought me to Los Angeles originally but that’s a whole nother podcast. I digress. For those who don’t know what the word lifestyle means or feels a bit broad. What does that mean in terms of the type of clients you serve? Can you give us some examples?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yeah, that’s a great question. Because lifestyle can mean so many different things. And it can be a very loose term. So we really focus on products that can be tangible, too, that you can literally put in your hands and have in your hands and you can use on your day to day. So we have a linen and towel company client, we also have a sunglasses and eyeglass clients. We have clients wear jewelry clients, so we try to stay in the category of where we’re kind of essentially pitching the same types of media contacts consistently. But they’re the ones that you’re going to see on the pages of the magazine that say, life and home or, you know, kind of the the products that are going to be more the more day to day use products.

Lexie Smith 

Have you always worked in kind of the product realm?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yep. So well, I started my career, my big first company I worked for was The Container Store down in Dallas. And so I worked with them for five years. So much fun. And so that’s where I got my feet wet, working with products and kind of pitching those types of stories that are really surrounding your lifestyle and what your day to day lifestyle is like, when I launched my firm, 12 years ago, I was really focused in the baby category and the baby parenting space because I was a new mom. And that was kind of ended up being where my expertise was. And then it’s kind of evolved into more of the lifestyle, less parenting space, but still really truly in that consumer product business.

Lexie Smith 

The Container Store in my mind is like the toys RS for adults, it’s just can’t it’s a candy store, I just go in, I’m like, I want that I want that I want that I want that.

Carolyn Sutton 

All of this. It’s crazy. Because when I when I first started my career down in Dallas, I worked in Dallas for fleishmanhillard at an internship there. And I literally walked into a container store there, I’d never been in one being from Omaha, I was obsessed, and I was like, I’ve got to work here. I wonder if they have a PR opening. And I happen to just they literally happened to have an entry level PR opening. So talk about divine intervention. It was I immediately applied and worked ended up getting the job. So I worked there for four and a half, five years, which was such a fun job. I mean, talk about becoming obsessed with organizing and the consumer that the target customer who I am like, totally the target customer right now with my lifestyle as it is now. And and what just what really works with tons of magazines, the today show all those things and helped open stores from Oregon to New York. It was such a fun job. It was absolutely such a great job.

Lexie Smith 

That kind of segues perfectly into a question I had was for those looking to cultivate media relationships, specifically with journalists, writers know, editors insert title in the lifestyle realm, do you have any tips because that’s really where you’ve lived in your career in that lane.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes. And I will say my tips now are the same that I leveraged and use back when I was starting at The Container Store. I’m working at The Container Store, I still dive deep into magazines and literally rip out the pages, my husband will laugh because we’ll be like laying in bed and I’m looking at a magazine and all of a sudden he’s like, and he’s just like, Oh my gosh, she’s still doing this. After all these years, I rip out the pages of where I want my clients to be. So I’ve got that editor’s name, I’ve got that last story that they wrote. And I can really, and I keep a stack of those. And I would go through I used to go sit at for example like a Barnes and Noble and sit and go through all of the magazines and just spend hours there looking at these writing their names down reading the stories that they wrote. And that, you know, that’s kind of how I really kept my focus with the magazine industry. Now the same obviously, it’s much more digital and I still do the same for that I will still take either screenshots if I see it on my phone, or you know, people keep a running list of who I need to target and what stories they’ve written. So I mean, it really comes down to truly reading the media that you want your clients to be in and understanding the stories that they write.

Lexie Smith 

And then once you’ve found that editor, I love that you rip out magazines or something. I’m very tangible. I’m not a Kindle reader. So I like having something in my hand but do use just you know pop in their inbox on a random Tuesday or how do you go from I saw you in a magazine. I know I want a relationship with them to making that first icebreaker contact.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yep. Such a good question. And I mean, I have so many examples that have resulted in success from doing that and I do literally send an email that is very clear that I knew And I know what they write about. And I and I know specifically and then I from there, we’ll dive into my pitch that really shows how my client can be a story that will interest them. And that is truly in line with what they write about. Another option too is on Instagram, developing that relationship on Instagram and following that editor reporter on Instagram and commenting on stories that they they might post about or, or things that they are posting about. So you develop and you have your name kind of appear in that capacity. And a perfect example of a cold pitch I would call it to is actually a New York Times editor who are she’s a reporter, small business reporter who wrote about, you know, small business during the pandemic. And I tracked her on behalf of one of my clients, and pitched her on there, I related to her very specifically, I knew she lived in Detroit. So I knew we had the Michigan connection, kind of contacted her in that respect, and then went into my pitch that really was specific, resulting in for my client a Christmas Day, a front page story in the business section of the New York Times major story. So it was I mean, it was like a perfect, you know, perfect cold pitch that those cold pitches work. If you do them truly correctly in terms of having that relationship based and making sure that you are speaking their language and you follow them you truly know you know, what their, what they write about.

Lexie Smith 

That is like the creme de la creme, I know, that moment must have been so exciting for not only your client, but you and your firm, because I know we put so much blood sweat and tears into these pitches and our clients. And so it’s it’s their win, but it’s your win too. So I just congratulations.

Carolyn Sutton 

Thank you, it was very exciting. It was it was also fun, because it was such an awesome feature and huge feature and also to show my kids like have them understand on on Christmas morning to like how cool that is and what that means. And it is so much blood, sweat and tears, I mean to the researching of it to crafting that pitch. And to that constant follow up and the crossing of the fingers that it actually comes to fruition. So it was a good moment.

Lexie Smith 

Well, I hope you have that frame somewhere you can’t see it in the view, you’re seeing me and obviously everyone listening can’t see. But in front of me on my wall, I have framed some of my most proud print moments. And for those moments when I’ve been pitching and I’m just not. I’m feeling a little down. I feel like it’s been some crickets I look back up. And I remember like how good that moment felt when that came out. So I hope you have that saved somewhere framed in the office or at home. Because that’s amazing.

Carolyn Sutton 

I do I do. And I do the same. I frame all my good. My truly truly big, big ones that take time and just remind you when you’re feeling stuck and you’re you’re not getting any momentum or you feel like no one’s responding. It’s It’s It’s a good reminder that they do come to fruition. It just takes time.

Lexie Smith 

Yep, yep. So I love that. Okay, so I pulled this line from your bio, quote, securing well thought coverage and collaborations from product roundups to in depth brand profiles requires the right storyline working with the appropriate contact at the precise time. You’ve kind of talked about that a lot, which is great. And I could not agree more. But I want to break down that sentence a little bit more. So how do you know what the right storyline is? How do you know who the right contact is and what the right time is?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yeah. And yet, you know, one of the things that our firm really makes sure that we do is we partner with clients that we are truly passionate about. And we believe in their mission, we believe in their brand. Because that allows us to tell the story of this client with true conviction and really dive deep into what story angles, we can tell. So we spend a lot of time experiencing, experiencing the brand experiencing the product, getting out to meet with them in person spending all that time to really understand it and uncover what these stories are. So we go beyond just the product, trying to figure out what about your client is beyond just the product that you’re going to try to get in the press, but creating these awesome storylines and coming up with these different angles. And with that, we break it down, whether it’s a business angle, whether it’s a personal family story that needs to be told, whether you know what, whatever that really, truly might look like. And then truly finding a match for them. And I think it comes down to again, understanding the landscape of the media that you’re working with. And I was listening to one of your podcasts about somebody talking about the news release and how that’s, you know, press release versus news release and how do you leverage that and you know, looking at that those types of news releases are all of those things are just the smell tools to help shape that story and now it’s so much So we’re, we really push our clients to do video creating video to tell that story to help then use that to send to the media context, so they can see it in a different format. So we just, we find the value in finding all the little nuggets that can be told. And then kind of piecing together the puzzle is where they can be told.

Lexie Smith 

Beautiful and shout out to Tony, that was her episode, I wish I was educated enough on my own show to tell you what episode that was. But hey, we’ll put it in the show notes if you want to learn about leases. Um, so thank you for that.

Lexie Smith 

Present time as a thank you for tuning into the show. I am gifting all of my listeners a completely free Pitches a good checklist, which outlines all the things you should do. Before you ever hit send on a pitch ever. to snag it. All you have to do is visit my website. We’ll also put this link in the show notes at the theprbarinc.com/pitchitgood/.

Lexie Smith 

One topic I really want to focus on today is how to create an annual news cycle for your company or brand.  First off, for those who don’t know, let’s start with the definition. What is a new cycle and an annual news cycle?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes. So a new cycle is basically the timeframe where news will come out and news will appear and what the media is talking about at that time. So we take a step back and look at it and we put together and monthly and then six months and an annual content calendar, pitching content calendar. And with that, we kind of slot out what topics are super timely at that time for the media from a short lead and a lonely perspective. So we work with each of our clients to make sure that they understand what we’re going to be pitching each month from a short lead and a long term perspective. So that can include anything right now. So we’re in July. So right now our focus for our clients is this for the short term is going to be back to school, kind of the early fall seasonal stories on you know, gosh, tailgating and fall home and all of those things. But we are also so knee deep right now and holiday gift guide, pitching to and trying to secure some of those holiday stories. But even at this time, we are already looking at the 2022 calendar, and pushing our clients to tell us what they have coming out or are on in the works. So we can start slotting those out for what we’re going to be pitching in 2022. So the new cycle is continually changing, it’s continually. There’s so many topic based stories that are happening each month. And if you can set aside a six month calendar for yourself and for your clients and slot out where you think that your clients are going to be a fit based on what is topic and what is timely each month, then that just gives you all the more leverage to kind of create these additional storylines for your clients, whether it is you know, product roundups, or whether it’s going to be one of our clients is an eyeglass wear company and gnash world sight day is in October. So we are really prepping for that as of now. So just looking at those new cycles, I think last year is a really good example with the election. And knowing that the election was going on, I have one client that what is in American flag company. So in that was like very much trying to figure out the new cycle. And when we’re going to be our times that we knew we cannot pitch because there’s no point in wasting our efforts with the election going on. Or there were times where we knew we had to lock and lock and load and try to pitch even more heavily in advance of that. So um, that’s kind of how we approach it and how we look at the news cycle. Obviously, once we get into early November, with Black Friday and holiday, it is go time for pitching efforts there. And then what we find is that there’s kind of a lull right around Christmas and until probably early January, and then January for us gets incredibly busy again, because that’s what again, we really plan out that that that annual news cycle and where we’re going to be pitching our clients.

Lexie Smith 

So a question that was coming to mind for me was one that I get asked a lot. And I think it can kind of know, I know it can differ based on industry and type of publication, you know, print versus digital have different lead times. And it’s kind of a piece of the equation that I think a lot of people struggle to figure out. And we’re in July, you said you are already either prepping or starting your knee deep and holiday gift guide. So first question, Would you say that’s really specific to the lifestyle lifestyle industry? Is it just for print? Are you prepping digital right now? Can you kind of talk a little bit more about that longer lead time process?

Carolyn Sutton 

So we’ll talk specifically about the holiday gift guide for example, we start prepping for that in May. We work with our clients to have them create lookbooks and so what those lookbooks are is really showcasing their products which could be really great gifts, and we break them out into categories for for mom for dad for best friend under $100, under $50 creating those lookbooks and so we’re prepped and ready to go. Go. And so come July, late June, early July. I feel like it’s later this year than it has been in years past. And I think that’s due to the fact that a lot of editors are still working from home. And you know, in advance, we would ship a ton of product and holiday gift boxes to their offices at Hearst, or whatnot. But now, it seems to be a little bit later. And so I think we start pitching for print in late June, early July, digital, we will start in late October, because digital is not thinking about that right now digital is trying to wrap up back to school, those types of stories coming for August.

Lexie Smith 

Perfect think thank you for touching on that. And I want everyone just to repeat what she says there is a longer lead time for print than digital, which intuitively makes sense, right? That you know, print, there’s a lot more pieces to the puzzle, and they have to physically print something tangible. So you’re You said you’re you’re prepping these lookbooks? In May, you’re starting to pitch in June or July. I mean, are you full on sending that pitch? Or are you just like beginning the conversation of asking editors, if they’re ready to receive pitches, what does that that first touch look like?

Carolyn Sutton 

That first touch looks very much like a very specific holiday gift guide pitch. And that goes out in probably mid June to late to late June, early July. What we’re feeling this year is that they are going to be making more decisions towards the end of July as to what those specific gift guides will be. But it also takes that follow up email because they are getting so many emails. And so that follow up we give that week and a half, maybe two weeks right now, because I think this summer with the way the Fourth of July landed, and we just trying to time your follow up pretty, pretty specific. So we do the follow up about two weeks later. And so with that is you know, you pitch right out of the gate, the holiday gift guide, pretty clear about what your pitches, and then follow up with that, you know, that follow up asking if you can ship samples, hopefully they will accept everybody is so different in whether or not they’re accepting samples where they’re located. And so, so that’s kind of how we approach it.

Lexie Smith 

Yeah, and I will say, again, I don’t know what episode it is people sorry. But with Tatiana Diaz from Refinery29, if you guys are interested on that topic more, she shares her perspective, as a journalist in the fact that she lives in this very small apartment, and she just can’t accept all the presence, which we would think all the presence all the product, right. So it is, you know, best practice to to ask, I would say these days, because some people just can’t. There’s just a lot, they can’t take it all.

Carolyn Sutton 

And that and we are totally feeling that too. That’s why we are very like, would you like samples, or here’s our pretty lookbook. Because we’ve heard that same exact thing where some of them are like, we just can’t accept anything anymore. Like we just don’t have the space. And you know, and prep prior to COVID. I mean, we would ship out we’d have 2535 packages ready to rock and roll and we’d ship those and it’s just completely different now. And that’s any it was different last year, it’s they’re still different this year. And I think it will probably remain a little bit different. But there’s also other ways that you can look at it too whether you schedule, if you have a ton of products that make sense, you can try to create a visual media deskside on zoom with with the editors that they’re willing to do that. So there’s other creative ways to get around it. That doesn’t shipping product.

Lexie Smith 

Yeah, and I’m assuming your new company, is it brand for a brand brand? brand? brand, your brand is perfect for helping you create those workbooks. Yeah.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yep, yep, exactly in a very visual format. So we brand your brand is awesome, in the sense because there are so many, so many people are in need of content, and creating those content photoshoots the lifestyle photoshoots finding the right photographer, and then the videographer. And so it just what we’ve found is the media is also in major need of really pretty pictures, they just really are because they don’t have the ability to go out and do these photo shoots that they have done in the past, whether it’s because of budgets or limitation on travel. So they are eager and open to having more and more imagery. So we have just made it a priority for our clients to really ensure that we’re doing more content photography. And with that doing, you know one or two minute videos to that shape that story and help create that story too. And so that can be used in place of that that physical box that they typically receive with with goodies and product and all that good stuff.

Lexie Smith 

And it’s really smart. If you have a high ticket or high cost item you can’t, you know, ship out $5,000 necklaces to every editor. What I’m realizing we should pause and define real quick is what is a lookbook for those of you for those listening who may be Like, Oh, yeah.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yeah, no. Yep, that’s a great, great comment. So a lookbook, what we define as a lookbook is a visual format of the brand’s products and story. So it can be as simple as being in a PDF format. And it can be anywhere from five pages to 20 pages based on how big your brand is, and how much you want you need and what to share. But it basically is almost like a, it’s a branded lookbook words, talks about your products, your story, who your brand is, and then and then we break it down really specifically to make sure that we include price points, and you know, details about the image, whether how many what sizes, that particular you know, blanket comes in, or whatever it might be. So getting specific so your editors can visually see and find out all the information in that one specific document.

Lexie Smith 

I think that’s a great overview. Thank you any tips on for anyone listening who’s like, Okay, I’m going to make a lookbook tips on what things they should be cognizant of when making that you know, types of photos, you sizes, really anything that you think is helpful for people to hear.

Carolyn Sutton

Yep, you want the editors to know that you have not only lifestyle, photography, but you’ve got those silo shots. So those those white background shots, so I would recommend doing a good mix of those photos within that lookbook. And then just make it super clear, I always have to go back to my creatives and say make the font bigger, make sure you you hyperlink that product, if it’s on your website, so hyperlink that product, so that the editor or the journalist can just click on it and be linked to the website, put the price point, put the sizes, put all those like real basic pieces of information that may determine whether or not they include your product or your brand. In that particular lookbook. Perfect,

Lexie Smith 

I love it. So we need to wrap up soon at 500 more questions and per me, me fashion. But real quick before before we wrap up. This is a general question. But clearly, we have a PR pro and in our midst right now. So any general PR tips that you want to share. And let me say that can be really relevant to anyone from a publicist who’s doing pr at a client’s behalf to an entrepreneur who’s trying to do this themselves. Anything that you feel, you know passionate about are called to share advice wise.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes, I can think of two specific ones. One, I want to say don’t ignore your local media. And and that means that focus on your own specific market to try to generate stories in whatever capacity that might be, whether it’s magazine, TV print, your local market can be a really great space to start. And also to develop relationships with those particular journalists and help just kind of ramp things up a little bit. So I would say never ignore your local media. And then the other thing too, is it. If one pitch doesn’t work, take a step back recraft it rework it re updated, and really just know that it takes truly creating specific pitches for specific journalists to get that coverage that you want that that mass pitching is out the window, we don’t do it, we we don’t even copy paste a pitch from one editor and change that first line, we make it very, very specific. So that takes longer. And I think that’s important for clients to know that too, that, you know, I think there were days where we’d send out so many so many pitches all at once. And now it’s like it takes us longer because those pitches really resonate with that particular journalist or editor more and we want to be respectful that I don’t want my name to ever be thought of that somebody just mass pitching, I want them to remember that I gave them a great story. And while it might not have worked at that particular time, and it might work down the line or there might be another one that might work down the line.

Lexie Smith 

Could not agree more I say this to all of my clients, I just led a workshop this morning. This was a big point I hit on I would rather someone send five highly customized targeted pitches, then 50 that they just kind of threw together and more often than not you’ll you’ll find those five are actually going to get results so it’s not a numbers game. Yeah, no, I’m a numbers game here. So I couldn’t agree more and we’ve obviously talked a lot of things pitch in now I need to know what we can find you sipping so what is your favorite beverage alcoholic or non alcoholic?

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes, well coffee is the the most obvious but I you can find me sipping tequila. Really good tequila.

Lexie Smith 

Oh my God, that’s hysterical. I can I can only do it in a margarita. But ironically Margarita is my favorite, like cocktail on on the planet but give me a shot of tequila or a glass and I can’t I can’t hang.

Carolyn Sutton 

It’s gotta be the really, really good stuff. And I used to drink wine and I found that it just I get the worst headaches and doesn’t even one glass. So I just have a little tequila. Really nice tequila. And it’s all it’s good stuff.

Lexie Smith 

That’s good stuff. Do you have a favorite brand that’s coming to mind.

Carolyn Sutton

I do love Casamigos Reposado it’s just got a little bit of a honey taste to it so that, but I’m always open to checking out new and great tequila.

Lexie Smith 

Slide into her DMS if you haven’t, actually don’t do that. Don’t just slide into our DMS unless she wants you to. But yeah, Casamigos is great. Actually, they were a partner, a brand partner of mine at one point, so I had lots of those bottles laying around my office once upon a time, but again, I only do the margaritas. So that’s great.

Carolyn Sutton 

I’m getting a margarita. They’re good and it’s good anyway.

Lexie Smith 

So last thing is just really how people can connect with you. And if they’re interested in working with your firm, tell them where to head to learn all the things.

Carolyn Sutton 

Yes, yep, you can find us at CarolynSuttonPR.com at our website and that is a great starting place. You can also follow me on Instagram at Carolyn Sutton PR for fun snapshots of our clients and media coverage and just kind of some day to day. Those are the two best spots to find me.

Lexie Smith 

Perfect. Well Carolyn, thank you so much for coming on the show today and I will end it in honor of tequila by saying salud.

Carolyn Sutton 

Thank you so much. This has been so fun like the I really appreciate it.

Lexie Smith 

Hey guys, if you are enjoying the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast, please do me a huge favor and leave a review wherever you are listening. If you want to connect with me to learn more about THEPRBAR inc., you can do so on Instagram @theprbar_inc or you can check out my website at theprbarinc.com. Cheers!

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