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Winning Big Media Awards & Amplifying Visibility with Gesche Haas of Dreamers & Doers – Podcast Transcript

Winning Big Media Awards & Amplifying Visibility with Gesche Haas of Dreamers & Doers

Episode 34 – Winning Big Media Awards & Amplifying Visibility with Gesche Haas of Dreamers & Doers – Podcast Transcript

SPEAKERS

Lexie Smith, Gesche Haas

Lexie Smith

Hey guys! I’m Lexie Smith, travel enthusiast, lover of puns, pizza and wine, PR Coach and founder of THEPRBAR inc., and you’re tuning in to the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ Podcast. Today’s news worthy founder Gesche Haas is the Founder/CEO of Dreamers & Doers, a private collective that amplifies extraordinary entrepreneurial women through thought leadership, authentic connection, and access. Dreamers & Doers has built a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem of over 34,000 women globally and also publishes a monthly newsletter, The Digest, that curates top resources for female founders. Gesche has been featured on Bloomberg TV, CNNMoney, The New York Times, Huffington Post, Business Insider, Forbes, Fortune Magazine, Refinery29, Vice, and other major media outlets, as well as at the United Nations, where she spoke during the sixtieth session of the Commission on the Status of Women. She is a regular content contributor to Nasdaq, Brit + Co, and 500 Startups. She has also won a multitude of awards including “Empowered Woman of the Year”, “Best Remote CEO”, “New York Talent Cultivators” and full pause fresh off the press since we recorded “Forbes Next 1000 2021: The Upstart Entrepreneurs Redefining The American Dream.” In today’s episode, we talk all things Dreamers & Doers. We pull back the curtain on what goes into landing big time awards, what PR and visibility has done for Gesche and her community. The strategy behind her unique onboarding and membership process, and much more. Oh, and she invites everyone over to her house for a mezcal sour. So, without further ado, let’s get started. I first heard about dreamers and doers from a client and friend of mine, and immediately submitted an application to join. I then had to exercise patience, because as you guys will learn dreamers and doers has a very specific and selective membership approval process. But spoiler alert, I got in Yay, me. And it was the very first onboarding call when I had the privilege to meet Gesche. And within I don’t, I don’t know, two seconds of her speaking, I already knew that I was going to love this woman. Gesche, I am so excited and honored to have you on the show today. Welcome, officially, I have so much I want to get into with you. But I always kick things off by asking this question, what is it that you like to do outside of work for fun?

Gesche Haas 

I, as community leader, ironically, really loves spending time alone with myself. So, if I’m don’t have two young kids, if I’m not working, and if it’s not with my kids, I like being on my own and ideally doing nothing.

Lexie Smith

I feel that I always mess this up. I’m either an introverted extrovert, or the opposite of that, where I need me time, I can’t always be on which people are surprised about because I’m in PR. But do you resonate with that at all?

Gesche Haas 

So much, and actually feeling really like self-conscious about it. But I think as someone who just constantly gives by being, you know in PR or being a mother or being a community leader, you need a little time just for yourself into process. And I find that jobs like that, roles like that, like you attracted to them if you’re like a sensitive person, and you love other people. So, you do need a little bit barrier, because otherwise you can’t continue giving to others.

Lexie Smith 

Hmm, I’ve never heard it worded that way. But you are so accurate. And I am for sure sensitive. My husband, my mom, everyone will tell you that. So, there’s definitely something to that. I also want to know where in the world are you located?

Gesche Haas

I am in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. I was in New York for 13 years before and moved to your pre COVID three years ago, because our company is fully remote. But I was born actually in Africa, and I’m half German and half Chinese.

Lexie Smith 

The coolest person ever. So cool. Okay, so you speaking of the coolest person ever, you’re an entrepreneur and investor, mentor, advisor, and the founder and CEO of Dreamers & Doers. You do so many things. But first, I want to rewind time a bit. what came before the inception of Dreamers & Doers?

Gesche Haas

Yes. So, I did not know what I wanted to do out of college, and in some ways fell into finance because I was like, oh, if I start out with finance, I’ll have other options after, but I did. I worked at a hedge fund for five years and investment side then worked for a few early-stage startups before Dreamers & Doers started by accident out of a personal need.

Lexie Smith

Okay, and so we’ll get to that. But first, what is, I keep saying Dreamers & Doers? Let’s officially tell people they don’t know what it is. What is it?

Gesche Haas 

Yes, Dreamers & Doers is a private collective for extraordinary entrepreneurial women. And what we do is we provide thought leadership opportunities, and authentic connection and access. And one really special part about our secret sauce, which I probably shouldn’t be blasting out is our curation. So, we highly curated for members that are impressive and values driven. So, the values driven part is really, really important. That makes streamers indoors, just it’s actually quite hard to curate for that. But it’s a huge, huge differentiator. What makes it so special.

Lexie Smith 

Hmm, yeah, and I’m going to comment on that in a bit. But first, you said there was an accident that happened. Let’s hear that accident that brought this about.

Gesche Haas

The happy and very hard accident was after I had a background in finance and startups, even after those backgrounds, I felt very illiquid to start a company from scratch and they learned it the hard way. So, for anyone being a man or a woman starting something from scratch is so hard like you have so much self-doubt there’s so many things you doing for the first time in my case friends and family could not relate like why did you quit your full time job and what are you even working on? And I just just a really big struggle and I have definitely few meltdowns but because of that I realized how different things were the moment I joined forces with other women who were on similar past it was completely life changing. We were like actually started out with a co working brunch and for the first time we weren’t you know, talking about other people or about talking about like you know what, you know, event we were going to but we were talking about work, we were talking about our doubts. We were tangibly trying to support each other talking about our work cheerleading for each other booster calling each other out by underselling ourselves in terms of we’d always be like, Oh, you know, I can kind of just starting out with this thing. We’re like, No, you have to like word it differently that you have to own it more. So, I just noticed How different things were and dreamers indoors at the time wasn’t called that was literally just getting brunch. It wasn’t it didn’t have a name. But it was the thing that I kept organizing on the site every single weekend, it was my kryptonite, it was the one thing I couldn’t stop working on. And while my other business actually changed business ideas a few times, and I don’t think any of them were like bad ideas, but I just couldn’t persevere with it as much as I could, with dreamers and doers, and a year into it. After consistently working on it, it had grown so much that I either had to stop working on it, or go full time. And it’s funny, too, because quite a few people were like, Oh, you should work on this. And I’m like, no, it’s a community. It’s not a business. But then I was put into this position where I was taking up so many resources, I didn’t have a choice and not working on it anymore wasn’t an option. So, I just had to see what it could grow into. And that’s what brought us to where we are today.

Lexie Smith 

So, when was that? Were you in New York? And what year was this?

Gesche Haas

Yeah, so this was, so minus seven, eight years from today. 2014, I believe. And it was in New York City. So, it definitely helped at that time to have been based there just having a momentum having a network. And even today being based in Jackson, it does benefit me to have such a robust network, because I can leverage it to benefit the community. And but that’s where it started out. But right now, we have members all over the world, although biggest hub of over half a percent of our members are based in New York, but especially with COVID. And it’s become a lot more distributed.

Lexie Smith

In Ventura, California, hey, me holding down the floor. Yeah, no, it’s, it’s incredible. And now I need to insert my personal note, because I have joined many communities, both pre-entrepreneurship. And now in entrepreneurship. I am still to this day, and a variety of different and genuinely dreamers and doers is one of the most inspiring and valuable cohort cohorts I’ve ever been a part of. And I’m not just saying this to make you smile. But there you go. Please do smile. I really mean this. And I wouldn’t have invited you onto the show if I didn’t feel this way. So, you told us how it started? What are some of the steps that you’ve taken to grow it from brunch to now a business? What were the like the you know, you said seven years? What are the different steps, you know, that have happened along the way?

Gesche Haas 

Yes. And I will say the initial parts were quite organic. So initially, it was, I didn’t have in mind that this would become a business. So very organically just look what I gravitated towards, and actually do like quoting Steve Jobs for this because he said that it’s really hard to connect the dots before the fact it’s really straightforward after the fact. So, at that time, I wouldn’t have no seen this path ahead of me. And it’s good to sometimes just not overthink and just see what you gravitate towards, and then figure out, you know, the in between afterwards, but for me, it was just going with what I felt inclined with. And then so the first that was branch, the second step was we created a Facebook group to stay in touch. And it was very quiet at the beginning. And it wasn’t even intended to be like an active community. But just one step led to another step lead to another step. And so one year in, we had a pretty big Facebook group and branches every week. And that’s when I decided to work full time on it, initially, like many other businesses, and there was trial and error and trial and error. I don’t think there’s formally something that you could do wrong, but in our case, like figuring out what we did not want to do in our case. So, we had a CTO who was amazing. And still as a member up to the stage, that we were building out our own platform, we interviewed with Y Combinator, they flew us out to Palo Alto. And we realized that this wasn’t the path we wanted to go, because I dropped everything in my life to work on dreamers indoors. And oftentimes when you take venture funding, especially early on, it’s growth at all costs. So that’s something that we had to go through, especially because that’s what everyone talks about, like getting funding and doing all that. But we had to kind of try on those, close those shoes to figure out that that wasn’t right for us, the shoe didn’t fit. And with that, we decided to monetize early and to leverage existing technologies that would make us much leaner and wouldn’t require outside funding. And in many ways, and I’ve written about this, but like it’s a very unsexy approach, right? You don’t read in TechCrunch, about a company becoming profitable. You read about them, you know, getting lots of funding and all that stuff. But I’m in New York, I saw no speed events and take events and obviously many dues but also lots of like, sizing you up like Oh, how big is your office? How much you know, how much funding Have you taken in and there’s definitely moments I felt self-conscious. And even up to this day, once in a while. I will be like, oh, should we have taken a different path, but generally, it was a very intentional decision, right? Like every past has their pros and cons. So, we intentionally decided to not go the venture funded path and with that, We were able to prove out that there was demand for what we’re doing. And so many companies, especially during COVID, but even article It was a female funded companies have included, who were who took out the funding that were, you know, media darlings, and nothing wrong with press, I love praise, obviously like that we can get to that. But that’s obviously a core part of our offering, too. But if we went that route, and from there we just accept, and one after another, we just figured out what our offerings would be. And even up to this day, it’s always evolving. It always is, as our membership grows, and as our you know, this times change, we always keep adding to our offerings.

Lexie Smith

So, you’ve said this, you’ve kind of hinted at this a couple times, you know, the word intention and intentionally creating the members that you do. Not just anyone can become a dreamer, do you have a very specific, time, specific or time constricted, for lack of a better word, enrollment period and process? So first, can you just tell everyone a little bit more about that process?

Gesche Haas

Yes, we only accept members once a quarter. And the reason we do that is so that we can make sure it’s a really game changing experience, because it’s such a high touch community, and want to make sure that we can welcome members that they feel welcomed, and that we can deliver certain offers to them right when they join. So that’s why it’s only once a quarter quality over quantity. And members have to apply. And they get reviewed by a membership committee. And it’s easy, because it’s just two factors. But it’s hard because it can manifest in many different ways. So, they need to be able to contribute to the community and they need to want to contribute. So, it’s usually not a fit for someone who maybe has doesn’t have any work experience at all, just because it’s harder to contribute. And yeah, that’s kind of part of our offering that you know that it’s about us women that have achieved something impressive in their life.

Lexie Smith

And the so you guys in the beginning I said I had to exercise patience, because I think I I like applied right after they had just let in their last cohort. So, I’d wait like a whole quarter. I remember sending Hannah who’s in charge of membership, very polite email, like Hi. Just curious when spends the day and you know, just had to put on my patient pants, but I think it you the onboarding experience really was one of the most phenomenal ones I’ve ever been through. So, A kudos B, I’m curious, do you have any tips for those listening, who wish to execute a similar strategy and similar strategy by really intentional time specific, we’ll call it launches or openings or enrollment.

Gesche Haas

First, I’ll say to figure out if it’s the right fit for you, because every community comes in different shapes and sizes. So, figuring out what is the core goal of your community, and then once our infrastructure that will support that it’s not the right fit for everyone. And there’s a lot of downsides like to it. But in our case, we want people to truly they want people to who want to truly be there, right? Someone Can’t wait another month or another two months, maybe they aren’t the best fit. But for sure, we’re forgetting some numbers that we otherwise would have captured. If we didn’t have this approach, then if you do decide the cord based makes sense for your automations are ideal. If you can do some of it, I will say we will probably only we don’t actually have a lot of hours automated but and I wish we had obviously still feeling like they’re super personal touch. But I think there’s some ways to, to look into it, especially these days. And because there’s so much logic that has launched to support committees and courses that weren’t available at the time that we started. So, trying to keep in mind at the beginning what you’re trying to do, and trying to keep the technology in mind before you even execute, because then you might slightly tweak what you’re doing and save yourself a lot of headaches.

Lexie Smith

So I’m laughing because my phone just vibrated and I looked down it was a notification from Dreamers & Doers because I have that community as something that is allowed to show up on my phone because I really appreciate what is posted. And right now, you are on a platform called circle which for those who are in the community space, they may have heard of them may not you know I would say mighty networks perhaps as a competitor. I prefer circle. I like circle Do you have like a quick what is circled description that you’ve been able to kind of master more than what I just said.

Gesche Haas

It’s a community platform that’s very versatile. It was actually started by the founding team of teachable and we’ve been looking for another platform for a long, long time. Mighty networks were one of the ones that we were considering and do love them especially if you have a course that you’re launching, it makes a notice that they were more focused on doing a great job for courses. And that’s one reason we didn’t opt for them. And if you have a Facebook group or you have a slack group, I highly encourage checking out circle. And the one disadvantage maybe to Facebook is that you wouldn’t have organic growth as much, but especially if you have a group that doesn’t rely on that highly recommend, so.

Lexie Smith

Present time as a thank you for tuning into the show. I am gifting all of my listeners a completely free Pichtit Good Checklist, which outlines all the things you should do before you ever hit send on a pitch ever. To snag it all you have to do is visit my website, we’ll also put this link in the show notes at the snag at theprbarinc.com/pitchitgood. Yeah, no, I’ve appreciated it. And I like Yeah, I like it. So personal opinion for everyone listening and, okay, actually, pause editor, take that out. Because I have a couple clients in writing networks. I don’t want to throw shade proper. Okay, yeah, I personally love circle. Another, let’s talk a little bit more about one of the benefits. I think it’s really, really cool to dreamers and doers, and hyper relevant to that pod this pod casts and that’s the multitude of visibility offerings that you provide exclusively to members. I mean, you guys literally have an editorial board on staff. So, my question is, how did you develop the media relationships in order to be able to offer these amazing perks and opportunities to your members.

Gesche Haas

I will say that it is quite hard to do. And I’m sure you that’s why you have a fantastic business, because these people get reached out to all the time. And even for my case, like now that we publish to our members, I get outreach all the time from non-members wanting to get featured. So, it is in high demand. And it is a relationship that takes a lot of finesse, because there’s so much outreach to these individuals, right. So, for us, it was taking a step back and see, like what publications even cover the topics that we want to cover, and in the format that we want to cover it. So, to give a specific example, and we’ll have mentioning and featuring multiple members in one piece. And not every publication will do that, or they’ll do it and they want to include images. So that’s a really great way to weed out and be more focused. And then reaching out, I will say there’s some publications, we’ve tried to reach out a lot, and we’ve never, it’s never worked out. And others, we have an initial conversation. And it’s such a great fit. So, it’s a little bit like pitching an investor where it’s a numbers game, it’s about being thoughtful, it’s about reaching out, and also being creative. So not all of our partners are traditional PR firms, some of them are companies or brands that happen to have a blog that is very much aligned with our audience. So, figuring that out as well and kind of thinking a bit broader than what traditionally might be considered a publication.

Lexie Smith

So, visibility is you have like these three main pillars of the benefits of being dreamers and doers. I guess really quick, what are the other two?

Gesche Haas

One is authentic connection. And I’ll briefly mentioned, because we find that the professional side is so supercharged, when you emphasize the personal side, right? Like if I know why you’re working on the company that you’re working, or what else is going on, I’m much more likely to drop everything and help you in a professional level, if I have that connection with you. So authentic connections, super important. We don’t want to give it to be transactional. And the last part is access, which is just a catch all. So, the team will have relationships, maybe to advisors, mentors, or will provide access to each other events with thought leaders. So, access is a big range of different things that an entrepreneur could need.

Lexie Smith

So, access, authentic connection and visibility, what made you identify visibility as one of the most important pillars to offer your community.

Gesche Haas

There’s two parts to it. For one, when running a company, I think it’s so important to run a company that us a founder are deeply passionate about. So that’s where it started, because I love cheerleading and amplifying others. And in order to change the gender gap, I think it’s really important to for women to be visibly represented because I’d read business articles and it was just like advice from dudes and nothing against us and married to a tude. But it you know, like, like, some of the things I’m going through completely, like, some of the advice just completely didn’t translate to me. So that was like my deep initial passion to just want to invest in that. And it’s one thing I can’t stop working on. And then the second part was that as entrepreneurs and as part as women entrepreneurs, we don’t celebrate ourselves enough. So having that external validation, especially if you’re more early stage is so important one for you believing in yourself, but also your network. Like I’ve seen so many members share features that were made possible through numerous indoors, on their social media networks, and just seeing their networks come out and celebrate them and even learn for the first time in some cases, what their new company is, has been game changing, because now they have all these supporters, people that are aware of it and it’s like it’s become much more real. So, it’s just like this great circle that keeps benefits. members and us as well.

Lexie Smith

Yeah, I’m a, all my clients know this, I could not snap clap, agree with you more about the need to celebrate and one of the things I have here with my company is to celebrate all of life’s wins no matter how small. And so, I just one more thing I’m aligned with what you guys do. That being said, on the note of visibility, you personally have been featured in outlets such as CNN, Forbes, the Huffington Post, Bloomberg, many, many more. And you’ve won in a, I would say, an insane amount of words. So just to list a few everyone, “Empowered Woman of the Year”, “Best remote CEO”, “Top New York Talent Cultivators”, “Best of Tech on Twitter”, and there were many, many more. But the question I have for you is have winning these awards specifically, and being able to list them in your assets done anything positive, or I guess, or negative flip side of the coin, for you and your company.

Gesche Haas

I see, it’s only been positive, it’s one of the rare instances where I can’t really think of a negative. And it’s like, now these days, whenever I’m applying for something, sometimes they’ll be like, Oh, this is invite only trip or invite only event. More and more, I see a section of like, Hey, what are awards, you’ve won, because I think that’s a really quick way for organizers organizations to be able to tell how high caliber someone is if they’ve been featured or not. So, it’s helped in that regard. And I’ve noticed recently, now that there’s been more and more awards, that prove to be whenever I do a talk, or when I’m on a podcast, that these words are being read out, I haven’t even provided them, people find them and read them out. Because it just really helps with credibility, to establish yourself and make sure that people know that you’re a thought leader or have achieved some things in your life.

Lexie Smith

Yeah, I mean, Case in point, I literally, you’re on a podcast, and I just read them out. So, to prove your point right here. So, follow up question on that. Have you secured these awards? Are I guess how have you secured these awards? Have you had to proactively go after them? Or have they kind of just shown up on your doorstep? So, to say.

Gesche Haas

I’ve been fortunate and actually don’t like saying fortunate because it’s so easy. I think women with a Sullivan mark, oh, I’ve been so lucky. But it’s obviously there is some luck, for sure. But also, it is a result of our hard work. And the vast majority except of one that I can think of right now. We’re all inbound. So, the only one that I remember applying for was Forbes 1000. And I highly recommend anyone who is an entrepreneur should apply for it. It basically is any entrepreneur who makes less than 10 million. The Yeah, they’ve done two instances now and they’re gonna have to more of 250 each. So, apply, apply apply. For all the others. Actually, there was one that was an award where I you needed to nominate and I, you know, ask someone that can you nominate me also, like, if you see people receiving awards, I’m sure at least half of them, ask someone to nominate them, like you should do it. Because that allows you to have a bigger impact in your life. Don’t be shy about that. And all others were inbound. And I think because running a community, obviously, it’s very helpful. So at least two or three of them work were a direct result of having a community and members seeing the work that we’re doing and wanting us to succeed. So that’s helpful. Let’s see, it all happens gradual, like by very, very first talk I gave, I think public talk was maybe five years ago or something, or maybe not that long ago, right. And I remember how nervous I was. And it’s crazy. Like, just maybe I didn’t do a talk after that for two, three months, but like, it just very gradually adds on to it. So, I think just if you’re earlier along in your journey, anyone listening, just know that it doesn’t Oh, like for no one anyone that you see who is doing a lot of talks and TV interviews, they didn’t start that way. And just like starting small and not overthinking it, just and also sharing it every single time you were featured shared because someone might see it. And they might tell their friend or like a year later, they might reach out and ask to interview you. So don’t be shy about sharing it. It’s really, really important. And I’m sure that was a big reason. Like so many of these words have been inbound.

Lexie Smith

And thank you for pulling back the curtain in the realities of it. And yeah, it’s actually I recently wrote an article on this. Some there reaches a point in your career where a lot of these awards become inbound, they’re coming after you. But more often than not, and I guess it really depending on the category of award you’re going after there is some level of proactiveness needed by you or your team. The Forbes 1000 is a perfect example. An example I always give is the Inc 5000. You have to apply to be considered now the application process is quite extensive. Right. So, you’re really vetted, but it’s not like you know, you wake up one day and the Inc 5000 Award is sitting on your doorstep. So, I think that’s just helpful for people to hear when they see competitors or friends or other companies winning awards. And the question is asked of how, you know, you got to do a little searching, right? There’s there’s some awards that need to be applied for some is submission, and then eventually, yes, some do come free. I’ll share this really quick. Just because it’s kind of funny, and I think it’s happening a lot. There are a lot of small, niche media outlets that do. It’s a form of pay for play word lists, and one right now that’s going to be coming out on me soon, they reached out to me, I’m sure this happens to you all the time. geisha like pay us x. And we’ll just use the top 10. Why? Well, this, this specific company, and I won’t specifically call them out reached out to me like two months ago. They’re like, we want to feature you. It’s $3,000. I said, No, thank you, but I appreciate you like reaching out to me, they came back to me a couple weeks later, oh, we’ll give it to you for 2000. I’m like, still only doing organic opportunities. But again, all the respect, wish you nothing but the best. They just came back to me last week and said, Okay, fine, we’ll do it for free. I was like, I mean, literally, it’s free. Sure. And so I just wanted to share that story to for anyone try it, try going back and see if you can play with the smaller ones, but not with like the Forbes and the sorry, kind of squirrel. But that I thought that’s kind of an interesting story that just happened to me.

Gesche Haas

You know, your kindness to them, right. Like some people might not reply at all. And I think that was a big reason that they, you know, offered it to you for free.

Lexie Smith

Yeah, thank you, I you know, at the end of the day, and people get really mad. And I’ve seen some really nasty responses thrown back at these, these companies, their businesses, too, you know, and they have a right to operate the business model, they want to operate just as you have a right to participate. So, if you don’t want to participate, you know, Don’t be a jerk. Just say, you know, thank you. Like, I appreciate you, but no, thank you.

Gesche Haas

Exactly. And there’s a need for that, like, some people are so grateful that this opportunity exists, that they can pay for it and advance their business or their personal profile.

Lexie Smith

Yes. So yeah, anyways, sorry. Thank you for letting me scroll on that topic for a second. Um, I have one more, kind of more general pure question before its kind of a fun wrap up one. And it’s a bit more general. As an entrepreneur, this is like kind of an umbrella question, what role do you think PR and awards have played in growing your company in your career?

Gesche Haas

So, I like saying about PR and social media, it can be tricky, because it can easily become a vanity metric. Right? So, it’s all about being strategic. And I’m sure, like you advise your clients, I’m sure so well on this. Because what’s the goal with it, because you can very easily be a huge time suck and resource and not achieve the results and be a huge opportunity costs that might actually lead to you not succeeding. So, with that in mind, and being intentional about, hey, do I want a really big name to validate me? Or do I want a really small industry magazine, but that has the right audience to get me further reach is important, and how it’s helped me it has hugely helped with my visibility and credibility, just like people will look at my bio and and see all these names and take me seriously. I’m sure I’ve been invited to talks because of that. It’s kind of funny, because I don’t think I mean, I just hustling every day at home, half of the time in my PJs. So, it’s so funny that sometimes, you know, people are like nearly intimidated by them, like, Oh, I’m like the least intimidating person. But it really helps with our credibility and it opens doors and has people honestly, like, engage with you with more respect and respect your time more. And even it can be easy to spend too much time on it. So, there’s, I say no a lot to opportunities. So just knowing when to say yes and when to say no is equally important because no means you’re able to say yes to something else instead.

Lexie Smith

Yes, bold, underline italic could not agree more sometimes saying yes can cost you more than saying no, that goes for clients for press for life. Right. So, I think that’s really, really great advice. We’ve talked a lot about all things pitching. Now I have to ask, what can we find you sipping so what is your favorite beverage? Either non alcoholic or alcoholic?

Gesche Haas

I’ll pick alcoholic because I had back-to-back pregnancy. So, I’m like okay, like, drink again. Finally, I’m going to pick the adult beverage. It is a mezcal sour.

Lexie Smith

Mezcal sour. Okay, no mezcal, what’s the sour part?

Gesche Haas

You add lemon juice and egg white in it and a lot of syrup and you shake it up and it it’s fun if you can easily do it at home. And it just feels like your special specialty cocktail bar.

Lexie Smith 

Never had it. Again, I’ve said this before my routine listeners are like, you always say this. I am consistently floored by people’s dreams that they bring up on this show and me not having had them and just the diversity thing. When I first started asking this question, I thought everyone would be like wine, beer, or like have the same mojito it’s always been different. So I think it’s super, super fun to hear that as well. mezcal sour, any kind of I like to give this opportunity to. I know we’re COVID but the hospitality and restaurant industry has been hit hard. Any local, Wyoming kind of watering holes, you’d like to give a shout out to maybe they have a great mezcal sour or maybe not.

Gesche Haas

It’s so funny, because we were in Jackson, and a lot of people can drive here and by the National Parks, they’ve actually been killing it. Like, we can’t get takeout. Because the restaurants want to take it because it’s so busy, because everyone was gonna like everyone’s just here. So mezcal sours are please.

Lexie Smith

Yes, I love it. That’s great. That’s and that’s so true. I went to Yosemite for anywhere that’s like outdoor has done well, and the communities that that’s around that. So last question before I let you get going. I want to point people to where they can learn more about you dreamers and doers and get more information. So where would you like them to head.

Gesche Haas

For Dreamers & Doers, it’s our website, which is Dreamersdoers.com. So, it’s just those two words, DreamersDoers.com. And we have other information there, highly recommend signing up for our newsletter if membership isn’t a fit right now, or you don’t want to apply immediately. We’ve gotten so many rave reviews about it. It’s a free resource that comes out once a month about me on any social media platform. I’m very honest on Instagram if you want to just have a lot of real talk, but otherwise LinkedIn is perfect. And I look forward to connecting with anyone who wants to learn more.

Lexie Smith 

And I have to call one more thing out just because listeners can’t see this. We’re on Zoom right now recording this and her zoom handle says dreamy human and it’s my favorite zoom handle I’ve ever seen. So, look up dreamy humanoid, just kidding. So, what will link all the geisha’s personal kind of social networks and dreamers and doers. I’m such a fan of you of what you’ve created every single woman I’ve already connected with the community. I just want to say big time. Thank you for coming on the show today. And this is just the beginning of our relationship. So, Cheers to that.

Gesche Haas

Cheers to that. Thank you so much. so honored to be here and loved your questions and the entire conversation. Thank you

Lexie Smith

Hey guys, if you are enjoying the Pitchin’ and Sippin’ podcast, please do me a huge favor and leave a review wherever you are listening. If you want to connect with me to learn more about THEPRBAR inc., You can do so on Instagram @theprbar_inc or you can check out my website at theprbarinc.com. Cheers

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